History of the 225 Infanteriedivision (May 1940 - December 1941)

 

The 225 Infanteriedivision was established as a division of the 3 Welle by the Landwehrkommandeur Hamburg on 26 August 1939. The unit was immediately transferred to the Aachen region for border defence duties. Its commanding general was Generalleutnant Ernst Schaumburg.

During its service in France the division was commanded by:

  • Generalmajor Friedrich-Karl von Wachter (01.08.1940 - 30.05.1941)

  • Generalleutnant Hans von Baβe (30.05.1941 - 25.09.1942)

The headquarters of the division in France were located first in Le Quesnay and later in Flixecourt. The 225 Infanteriedivision consisted of the Infanterieregimenter 333, 376, 377 and other units.

 

1940

 

In May 1940 the division first occupied Walcheren and subsequently marched on Antwerp, where it had arrived on 18 May 1940.

In the period between 18 May and 22 May 1940 the division was located in Antwerp.

On 23 May 1940 the division started moving westwards and was located west of Mechelen.

On 24 May 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision was located in the Wetteren-Aalst area, continuing its move westwards.

On 26 May 1940 the division had been inserted into the front to the southwest of Gent, where it  relieved the 56 Infanteriedivision in the front line in Vinkt, near Deinze on the river Lys, on 27 May. Due to a lack of fighting experience the division suffered more than a hundred killed, including, 11 officers in the attack on the village. After the battle soldiers of the division shot 86 inhabitants without trial on suspicion of having taken part in the defence of the village.

On 28 May 1940, the day of the Belgian surrender, the division had been pulled back towards Gent, together with its sister division, the 227 Infanteriedivision. On this day, the division was first transferred from the 26 Armeekorps, only to be transferred again later that day to the 9 Armeekorps. Later that same day, this subordination was also undone and the division became directly subordinated to the 18. Armee. Further on this day the division received the mission of processing POWs in the area Gent-Zomergem.

On 29 May 1940 the Panzerjägerabteilung 225 and 1 batallion of the IR 377 of the division were tasked with securing the city of Brugge, while the remainder of the division was tasked with securing the area Maldegem - Eeklo - Brugge - Oostwinkel. The divisional headquarters was located in Maldegem.

A German map of 30 May 1940 marks the division as responsbible for the processing of POWs in the area north of Gent. In this sector of the front it shared these duties with the above-mentioned 227 ID (also located in the Gent area) and the 208 Infanteriedivision (located in the Brugge area). On this day the division was charged with processing the POWs of 4 Belgian infantry regiments. This mission was continued on 31 May and 1 June.

 

On 3 June 1940 the headquarters of the 225 Infanteriedivision were moved to Eeklo.

On 5 June 1940 the division was officially tasked with the mission of securing the North Sea coast from the Schelde estuary until (?, illegible) against enemy operations.

On 12 June 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision was informed that it wouls started moving south on 13 June, for which preparations were to start on this day. The division was to get ready to assemble in the area Brugge - Torhout - Roeselare - Tielt. For this purpose the division was subordinated to the command of the General zur besondered Verwendung III. In its current location the division would be replaced by the 358 Infanteriedivision. At 11.30pm an order of the latter arrived at the headquarters of the division. It ordered the division to march the following day and to march via Kortrijk/Courtrai and  Doornik/Tournai. to Cambrai. During the move the headquarters of the division were to be established at the Chateau de la Marlière in the Doornik/Tournai area.

On 14 June 1940 the area aound Cambrai was reached anf from 4 pm onwards the divisional headquarters was operational at Noyelles.

On 15 June 1940  the last elements of the division had arrived in the Cambrai area.

On 16 June 1940 the division, subordinated to the Militärbefehlshaber Belgien-Nordfrankreich and at a lower level the General zbV III, was to function as a mobile reserve in the area Arras - Albert - Bapaume.

On 19 June 1940 the division was located in quarters in the area Arras - Albert - Bapaume.

On 24 June 1940 the division was located in quarters in the area Lillers - St Pol - Bethune.

On 25 June 1940 the headquarters of the division was located in Bethune.

On 29 June 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision put one regiment of the division at the disposal of the Festungskommandantur Namur.

 

On 7 July 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision was ordered to take over rhe coastal security of the Dutch-Belgian coast from the Schelde estuary to the French-Belgian border. In this area, it was to relieve the 358 Infanteriedivision. The 225 ID would be subordinated to the Generalkommando XXXXII Armeekorps. Its mission was to destroy in counterattack any enemy landing attempt on this coast. All three regiments of the division were to be deployed with 1 batallion of each regiment in the front line (at the coast), together with the Radfahraufklärungsschwadron and the Artillerieregiment 225. The sector to be secured was to be divided into 4 sub-sectors, 1 for each regiment and 1 for the recce unit.

On 17 July 1940 the division was infomed that the Marineartillerieabteilung 204 was operational in its sector with 5x 7,5cm batteries and 1x 10,5cm battery for the defence of the ports of Zeebrugge, Blankenberge, Oostende and Nieuwpoort and the question of cooperation with the artillery regiment of the division was addressed.

On 23 July 1940 the division issued guidelines for the training of the troops.

On 26 July 1940 the division reported that it had received 3 captured Belgian 12cm batteries, one of which was certainly installed at Lissewege (the two ther locations cannot be deciphered from the document).

On 29 July 1940 the subordination of the 225 Infanteriedivision was altered. It was now subordinated to the Generalkommando V Armeekorps., commanded by the General der Infanterie Richard Ruoff.

On 31 July 1940 we learn that the 13. Batterie of the AR 225 (newly-established) was equipped with Belgian guns (possibly the 12cm guns above).

 

On 1 August 1940 the divisional commander Generalleutnant Ernst Schaumburg was appointed as Kommandant von Gross-Paris and replaced by Generalmajor Friedrich-Karl von Wachter, the then commander of the 227 ID.

In the second half of August 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision had is forces along the Belgian coast deployed as follows:

 

 

On 24 August 1940 the problem of the Dutch sector of the division was addressed. It was felt that the Radfahraufklärungsschadron's area to be secured was too large. Therefore, a new boundary was drawn some 5km west of Terneuzen. The above unit was now responsible only for the area east of that boundary (and based in Terneuzen). The area west of the new boundary was allocated to the 1. Kompanie/Panzerjägerabteilung 225, headquarted in Breskens.

 

On 5 or 6 September 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision was newly subordinated, this time to the Generalkommando XXIII Armeekorps., commanded by General der Infanterie Albrecht Schubert

On 7 September 1940 the new corps commander visited some of the deployed units of the division.

On 21 September 1940 the division consisted of a total of 12,078 troops.

 

In September 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision was deployed as follows

  • Divisionshauptquartier: Knokke

  • Infanterieregiment 333:  Gistel

  • Infanterieregiment 376: Brugge

  • Infanterieregiment 377: Diksmuide

  • Artillerieregiment 225: De Haan

    • I. Abteilung: Bredene

    • II. Abteilung: Blankenberge

    • III. Abteilung: Westende

    • IV. Abteilung: Oostende

  • 1/Panzerjägerabteilung 225: Breskens

  • Radfahraufklärungsschwadron 225: Terneuzen

On 4 October 1940 the division reported that the Italian air force was operating in the sector of the division.

A german map of presumably mid-October 1940 shows the deployment of the 225 Infanteriedivision along the Belgian and Dutch coasts. The details were the same as in September above.

On 18 October 1940 an order issued by the division stated that I/AR 77, schwere Artillerieabteilung 777 and the schwere Artillerieabteilung 735 were available for the division for relieving the crews of the 3 Belgian Beutebatterien as well as for taking over guard duties in the rear areas from the 225 Infanteriedivision. The latter was planned for 19 October. In the accompaying Anlage further details are provided on the Beutebatterien and the Wachen. These details have been processed in tje document below:

 

 

Also on this day, the division issued its first order for the relieving of the division by the 164 Infanteriedivision. The latter was to relieve the division in the period 31/10-2/11. It was clearly stated that the aim of the withdrawal was training and that it was to be taken into account that the division would return to the Belgian coast. The 164 Infanterieidvision would make the transfer from its current area Charleville-Rethel-Vouziers-Sedan. In turn, the 225 Infanterieidvision was to transfer to this area and was to assume security duties at the Nordostlinie (demarcation line). An Anlage to this document gives us a rare insight into the specific relief operations of the individual units. This information has been processed in the document below (with own clarifications added). To understand some of the information it is important to understand the following letters (Raum A= Bruges-Blanberge-Knokke; Raum B= Torhout-Oostende; Raum C= Diksmuide-Nieuwpoort-Veurne; Raum D= Tielt-Aalter-Sint-Joris-Ruddervoorde; Raum E= Waregem-Tielt-TGorhout-Roeselare; Raum F= Kortrijk-Wervik-Izegem):

 

 

On the basis of the above information we can also deduct the location of the main units of the 164 Infanteriedivision along the Belgian coast:

  • Divisionsstabsquartier Brügge

  • Infanterieregiment 440 mit III/AR220 im Raum Brugge-Knokke-Blankenberge

  • Infanterieregiment 433 mit IV/AR220 (Oostende) und II/AR220 (Bredene) im Raum Oostende

  • Infanterieregiment 382 mit I/AR220 im Raum Westende-Nieuwpoort

  • Panzerjägerabteilung 220 in Terneuzen

  • Pionierbataillon 220 in Jabbeke

In addition, we have every reason to believe that individual artillery batteries took over the same positions of the units they relieved, so that the detailed overview of mid-August still applies. Finally, the battalion headquarters locations will also probably have remained the same.

On 19 October 1940 the crews of 3 Belgian captured batteries (Beutebatterien) were relieved by units of the I/Artillerieregiment 77

On 23 October 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision issued its second and third orders for the relieving of the division by the 164 Infanteriedivision.

On 24 October 1940  the Panzerjägerabteilung and an other unidentified unit were already relieved in order to take over the guarding of the Nordostlinie (demarcation line), which role had until now been assumed by the 164 Infanteriedivision.

On 31 October 1940 the mass of the infantry regiments of the 225ID began being relieved. The new assembly area was mentioned as Charleville-Rethel-Vouziers.

 

On 6 November 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision issued its Ablösungsbefehl for the border posts at the Nordostlinie. Specifically, the Infanterieregimenter 376 und 377 were to relieve the troops of the Panzerjägerabteilung 225, with the latter unit moving to its final area. Further on this day, the division released a Merkblatt für die Absperrung der Nordostlinie. From the document we learn that only three organisations were allowed to give out crossing documents: the Passierscheinstellen II Trier, IV Brüssel, VI Paris.

On 8 November 1940 the division issued its first divisional order for the training of the division.

On 12 November 1940 the division issued its second divisional order for the training of the division.

On 14 November 1940 the giuard duty at the Nordostlinie (demarcation lines) was taken over by the Infanterieregimenter 376-377. During the remainder of November and December 1940 the division conducted mainly training.

On 18 November 1940 the division issued its third divisional order for the training of the division.

On 27 November 1940 the division issued its fourth divisional order for the training of the division.

 

In the period 16-21 December 1940 the 225 Infanteriedivision  was ordered by the XXXXII Artmeekorps to relieve the 296 Infanteriedivision in the Dunkirk sector.

Thus on 19 December 1940 the division issued the Divisionsbefehl Nr 1 for the relieving of the 296 Infanteriedivision in the Dunkirk area in the period 24-28 January 1941. An accompanying map shows that the planned areas for the regiments were: Belgian-French border to Malo-les-Bains for the IR 333, from Malo-les-Bains to Mardyck for the IR 377 and Mardyck - Fort-Philippe for the IR 376.

 

1941

 

On 11 January 1941 security duty at the Nordostline was taken over from the division by the Radfahrbataillon 403.

On 18 January 1941 the division issued its order for the continuation of the transfer. The divisional headquarters at this time were located in Valenciennes.

On 19 January 1941 the division issued its order for the change of direction of the transfer to the southwest. The divisional headquarters at this time were located in Valenciennes.

On 23 January 1941 the division issued its order for the taking over of the area of the 170 Infanteriedivision. The IR 377 was to march towards Barneville and the IR 391; the IR 333 towards St. Arnoult and the IR 401; the IR 376 towards Brucourt and the IR 399; the II/AR 225 towards Trouville-Lieu Harang and the II/AR 240 and the Nachrichtenabteilung 225 towards Le Quesnay Chateau and the NA 240.

On 25 January 1941 the division reported that rather than being sent to the Dunkirk sector, it was to be sent to the Le Havre sector (replacing the 170 Infanteriedivision).

 

On 1 February 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivion officially assumed command in its new sector around Le Havre.

On 2 February 1941 several units joined the division: II/Artillerieregiment 57, Pionierbateillon 215 (mit Brückenbaubataillon 631 and Brücko 2/408), Scheinwerferzug 333, Baubataillon 26, Stab Kommandeur der Bautruppen 24(?)).

On 9 February 1941 the Baubataillon 26, Stab Kommandeur der Bautruppen 24(?)). again left the division. Further on this day, the division issued its order for the deployment at the coast. Located between the 227 Infanteriedivision to its right and the 57 Infanteriedivision to its left, the division occupied the sector between the Seine estuary and Franceville-Plage. The units would be located as follows:

  • Panzerjägerabteilung 225: between the Seine and Equainville

  • Pionierbataillon 225: between La Rivière and Le Bois Hellain

  • IR 377 between Le Bois Hellain and Le Brévedent

  • IR 333: between Le Brévedent and Hennequeville

  • IR 376: between Monirioul and Villers-sur-Mer

The following units would be tactically subordinated to the division: II/AR 57 (deployed in the area of the IR 377), Pionierbataillon 215 (area IR 376) and the Scheinwerferzug 333 (deployed in the area of the IR 333). In the sectors of the IR 333 and IR 376, 1 batallion each of the regiments was in reserve at the disposal of the regiments. The divisional reserves were under the command of the Kdr IR 377: I/IR 377, PzJgAbt 225, Pionierbataillon 225 und 215 (mit Brüko 2/408), Regimentstab AR 225, I, II-IV/AR225, Stab Nachrichtenabteilung 225. The II/IR 377 was corps reserve. The divisional headquarters were located as follows: Führungsabteilung in Le Quesnay Chateau, Ib in Pont- l'Eveque, Kdt Stabsquartier in Reux. The division was subordinated to the XXXXIII AK.

On 20 February 1941 the II/Artillerieregiment 57 left the area of the division and its duties were taken over by the III/Artillerieregiment 225

 

On 1 March 1941 the Pionierbataillon 215 (mit Brückenbaubataillon 631 and Brücko 2/408) left the area of the division.

 

In the period February-April 1941 the 225 ID lost many of its rear service units.

 

On 26 April 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivision issued a new order for the deployment at the coast. This new order was necessary due to changes both in the won situation and that of the enemy. A first issue touched upon was command (Befehlsführung). Central here was the einheitliche Befehlsführung. In the event of an attack, but also in the preparations for the defence against such an attack, the land commander in any sector was to take overall command of all three Wehrmacht services, the Militärbefehlshaber and other German organizations. Tellingly, however, the navy and air force were excluded in as far as thet were were fulfilling their own missions. The second point discussed was the Gefechts- und Alarmbereitschaft. Here there were some changes. The normal situation in the Gefechtsgebiet was Gefechtsbereitschaft. The higher alert stages were erhöhte Gefechtsbereitchaft (previously Alarmstufe I) and höchste Gefechtsbereitschaft (previously Alarmstufe II). In a rather complicating manner, alert stages for reserve could also be called erhöhte/höchste Alarmbereitschaft, even though the result was the same as for erhöhte/höchste Gefechtsbereitschaft. The next subject was combat itself (Kampfführung). The division alone was responsible for the defence of the coast. The purpose of the coastal combat was the destruction of the enemy during the landing attempt, not after the landing. This had consequences for the deployment of MG's of which at least 1/3 had to be ready to fire within 2-3 minutes. Also important were defensive depth (Tiefengliederung) and Abriegelung, i.e. the sideways halting of an enemy penetration, if necessary combined. The mobility of reserves was also seen as important. The next issue was the use of artillery and other heavy weapons. The artillery was given three missions: The blocking of port entrances and the Seine estuary by means of Sperrfeuer, the blocking of naval approaches by means of pre-planned Planfeurräume and supporting the infantry in the combat for the coast. In addition other heavy weapons were to be installed in port entrances and at the end of jetties. Further items covered were communications, fortifications, keeping the peace in the country, and air defence.A special Anlage have instruction for the firing at naval targets. As long as the coast itself was not under attack this was a navy responsibility.

On 30 April 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivisiono became subordinated to the Höheres Kommando zbV XXXII with headquarters in Canteleu, near Rouen. Also on this day, the division issued an order for the further training of the division during the deployment at the coast. By 15 June the division was to be fully capable of mobile warfare. An Anlage contained special guidelines for the training in coastal defence.

 

On 2 May 1941 the division started training for operation Seelöwe. On the same day the division issued an order on the building of mobile units and Vorausabteilungen and on combatting enemy airlanded troops. For each regiment the following units were to be made mobile: 1 Schützenkompanie, 1 sMG Zug, 1 IG Zug, 1 Staffel IR Pionierzug on trucks + 1 Schützenkompanie on bikes + 1 Pakzug. The combatting of airlanded enemy was to be waged by the above mobile units of the infantry regiments and the engineer batallion, the Panzerjägerabteilung and the other reserves. These units were also the Jagdkommandos. Some changes to the order of 2 May were made in an order of 8 May.

On 6 May 1941 the division isssued an advance order (Vorbefehl) for the planned reorganisation of the division, as ordered by the Höheres Kommando XXXII. The aim was to move one regiment of the division north of the Seine to act as corps reserve in this new area. More specifically, the sector of the division was to be expanded north of the Seine river. On 24 May the Stellungsbataillon of the IR 377 was to be pulled out and the sector taken over by the IR 333. Then on 25 May the sector vacated by the IR 333 was to be taken over by the IR 376. Finally on 27 May, the IR 376 would undergo internal changes. The IR 377 was to look for new accomodation for most of its regiment in the area Lillebonne-Caudebec-Yvetot. One batallion (the divisional reserve) was to look for new accommodation in the area Beuzeville-Quetteville, thus south of the Seine. The IR 333 was to do the same in the area Englesqueville-St-Cloud-Pont-l'Evêque (the latter only for the rear parts). Further the AR225 was to prepare to move its II. Abteilung north of the Seine.

On 9 May 1941 a meeting took place concerning the unified command in case of an enemy attack. One document mentions the participants of the 3 Wehrmacht services. These are listed below:

  • Marine:

    • KzS Fricke, Chef des Stabes, Marinebefehlshaber Kanalküste

    • Fregattenkapitän Vollmer, Hafenkommandant Trouville/Deauville

    • LtzS Grabs, Hafenkommandant Honfleur

    • Hauptmann Oster, Funkkompanienachrichtenregiment zbV beim Kom. Admiral Frankreich

    • Oberleutnant Andreas, Heeresverbindungsoffizier beim Marinebefehlshaber Kanalküste

  • Luftwaffe:

    • Hauptmann Wippermann, Kommandant Stabsquartier Jagdfliegerführer 3

    • Hauptmann Schultz, Ia Flakbrigade VII

    • Major Kneuer, Kommandant Flughafenbereich Lisieux

    • Hauptmann Guntrum, Horstkommandant Beaumont-le-Roger

    • Oberleutnant Biel, Horstkommandant St-Gatien

  • Heer:

    • Major Koch, Kdr HKAA 510

    • Major Lotz, Kdr Beobachtungsabteilung 556

    • Hauptmann Hoenig, Kompaniechef Festungsbau-Kp 2./77

    • Bezirkskommandeur Langer, VGAD St-Aubin-sur-Mer

    • Bezirkskommandeur Riedels, VGAD Trouville

    • Feldpolizeisekretär Frank, GFP Deauville

In the document the officers present agreed that it would be impossoble to cover the entire area in front of the coast by fire, and the loss of stretches of coastline in case of a large-scale attack until the arrival of reserves was to be accepted. Many parts of the coastline could only be überwacht, not defended. The strongest sector was Trouville-Deauville-Canesy. Interestingly, the document also contains a detailed overview of all non-Heer units and command present in the sector. This overview has been processed below:

 

 

On 10 May 1941 the division issued the actual order for the reorganisation of the division as described above. In this document we further learn that after crossing the Seine (and thus moving into the sector of the 227ID) the IR 377 (less the batallion of the divisional reserve) and the II/AR 225 were to be the reserves of the HK XXXII and would be subordinated to the latter tactically.

On 14 May 1941 the division then issued a new order for the deployment at the coast. This is a very long document (17 pages). The sector occupied by the division was still that between the Seine and Franceville, with the 227 Infanteriedivision to its right and the 323 Infanteriedivision to its left. With the IR 377 now located north of the Seine, one sector was occupied by the Pionierbataillon 225. Deployed from north to south were thus the Pionierbataillon 225, IR 33 and the IR 376. Also subordinated to the division was the Scheinwerferzug 333. In the sector of the Pionierbataillon 225 the coastline would only be patrolled , with a real occupation only in important positions. For each of the two infantry regiments, 2 batallions were to occupy the coast, with one batallion as regimental reserve. Reserves for the division were: 1 verst Btl/IR 377, Panzerjägerabteilung 225, Pionierbataillon 225, III/AR 225, Stan Nachrichtenabteilung 225. The corps reserve were 2 batallions of the IR 377 north of the Seine. The Divisionsstabsquartier  was still located as follows: Führungsabteilung in Le Quesnay Chateau, Ib-Staffel in Pont-l'Evêque, Kdt Stabsquartier in Chateau Reux. In the area of the division the following artillery units were deployed: IV und I/AR225 and the HAA 510 with 3x 10cm batteries, 1 French 15cm battery and 2 railway batteries

The next item discussed was that of the calling of artillery fire: Speerfeuer and Planfeuer. The former was only fired for by the division; the latter by the division or Heeresartillerie, in both cases on the order of the Marinebefehlshaber (though in case of the divisional fire also at the own initiative of the division). The remainder of the items discussed in the document is not processed here, except for that of the Stellungsbau. Here, six points were made:

  • 1) The HKL was to be secured throughout by a line of barbed wire.

  • Strongpoints were to be strengthened by an all-round obstacle defence

  • Roads leading from the beach into the villages were to be blocked by spanische Reiter or the use of these was to be prepared.

  • The above tasks were to be carried out by the infantry. Engineers would not be made available for this kind of work

  • Positions made by the use of sandbags were to be camouflaged in such a way that they would not be visible from the water

  • In Trouville the stairs leading up to the promenade were to be blocked in such a way only that it would still be possible to use them to evacuate a ship on the water

In terms of cooperation with other troops, the list was the same as that in the order (and PDF) of 9 May above.

On 15 May 1941 the division was reported to be short of some 1,000 men. In addition, it was short of motorized vehicles, weapons (e.g. light mortars and Panzerbüchsen) and some equipment. However, at the same time, the division was predicted to be fully combat ready by July.

On 21 May 1941 the division issued a new order for the assembly of the divisional reserve. First, the divisional reserve were detailed: Kommandeur AR225 mit Regimentsstab, das Divisionsreservebatillon von IR 377, (nach Zuführung) 1 Zug Panzerwagen (IR 333), Panzerjägerabteilung 225 mit unterstellter Radaufklärungsschwadron, Pionierbataillon 225, eine nich in Stellung befindlichen Abteilung der AR225, Gefechtsstaffel Nachrichtenabteilung 225, 1 Betriebstrupp (mot), 2 kleine Funktrupps a, 2 Tornister Funktrupps d. The code word for the alerting of the division was Landaffe-Alarm. Three contingencies had been prepared: Fall I Einsatz Touques, Fall II Einsatz Dives and Fall III Einsatz Orne, reflecting the three prepared directions for a counterattack. These contingencies were further detailed in Anlagen.

On 26 May 1941 the 28 Infanteriedivision, which was a part of the VIII Armeekorps of the AOK 9, was transported out of the area of the Höherss Kommando zbV XXXII. This division had, apparently, also performed a reserve function, since its place was taken by the reinforced 377 Infanterieregiment of the 225 Infanteriedivision, which was moved to the Lillebonne area as Korpsreserve. Further on this day, 4 items were added to the section Stellungsbau in the order of 14 May above:

  • For fortification work the following priorities existed: first were the Kampfstände at or near the HKL, followed by the resistance nests tobe added to the strongpoints behind the HKL, then the unifying of the latter into coherent strongpoiints and, finally, the construction of rear positions

  • Especially important positions were to be protected by concrete (but see below)

  • In each regimental sector the former would only be the case for a maximum of 1 Pakzug, 2 MG-Gruppen and 3 B-Stellen.

  • During the above construction work the weapons were temporarily to be repositioned and remain fully operational

An accompaying map shows the units of the division (down to batallion level ) in the following locations:

  • The Divisionsstabsquartier  was still located as follows: Führungsabteilung in Le Quesnay Chateau, Ib-Staffel in Pont-l'Evêque, Kdt Stabsquartier in Chateau Reux.

  • IR 376 in Brucourt (I in Cabourg, II in Dzulé (reserve) and III in Villers-sur-Mer

  • IR 333 in Deauville (I in Deauville, II in Saint-Martin-aux-Chartrains, III in Trouville)

  • IR 377 in Villequier (I in Bois-Himont, II in St-Aubin, III in Beuzeville)

  • AR 225 in Trouville (I in Villers-sur-Mer, II in Motteville, III in Le Pin, IV in Villerville

  • Panzerjägerabteilung 225 in Broglie (with the Aufklärungsschwadron in Orbec)

  • Pionierbataillon 225 in Gonneville

  • Dinafü in Cambremer

  • Nachrichtenabteilung 225 in Manneville

On 27 May 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivision was informed by the Höheres Kommando XXXII that the divisions of the 3. Welle would be pulled out of coastal defence duties with a view to their training and unit completion. The division was to be relieved by the 332 Infanteriedivision in Küstenverteidigungsabschnitt G, between Le Havre and Cabourg.. After having been relieved the 225 ID was to move into the area of the 93 Infanteriedivision near Amiens.

On 28 May 1941 the II/AR 225 arrived in Motteville as corps reserve (Korpsreserve) of the HK XXXII.

On 29 May 1941 a Vorbefehl was issued for the relief operation of the 225 Infanteriedivision by the 332 Infanteriedivision. The relief operation would be carried out as follows: IR333 durch IR677, IR376 durch IR676, IR377 durch IR378, AR225 durch AR332 (I. Abteilung im Abschnitt IR333 (677), II. Abteilung im Abschnitt IR376 (676), III Abteilung im Abschnitt der Korpsreserve).

On 30 May 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivision received a new commander. On the one hand, the current commander, Generalmajor Friedrich-Karl von Wachter, was moved from the 225ID to the 267ID On the other hand Generalmajor Hans von Baβe was moved from the Division Nr 182 to the 225 ID.

 

On 2 June 1941 an order for the relief of the 225 ID by the 332 ID and the transport of the former was issued, stating that the movement was to take place in the period 10-20 June.After having been relieved the 225ID was to assemble in an area north of Amiens. Further on this day, the 225ID also issued the first order for the marching of the division towards the new area. From 16 June onwards the divisional headquarters were to be located in Flixecourt. This order was accompanied by detailed marching routes and a detailed map of these routes. 

On 3 June 1941 Generalmajor Friedrich-Karl von Wachter departed. Also on this day, the division issued its second order for the relief of the 225 ID by the 332 ID and the transport of the former.

On 6 June 1941 the division issued its second order for the marching of the division towards the new area. For some units, the new billeting areas were already mentioned: Divisionsstab und Sanitätskompanie in Flixecourt, Stab AR 225 in Domart-en-Ponthieu, the Nachrichtenabteilung 225 in Yseux und Bourdon, the Verpflegungsamt 225 in Condé-Follie and Poix and the Schlächtereizug 225 and the Feldpostamt 225 in St. Quen. The date for the transfer of command was fixed on 13 June.

On 8 June 1941 the new commander, Generalmajor Hans von Baβe, arrived with the division.

On 10 June 1941 the units constituting the Korpsreserve of the Höheres Kommando XXXII were also changed. Thus, IR 678 (332ID) relieved IR 377 (225ID) and III/AR332 relieved II/AR225. Further on this day, the 225 ID issued the third order for the marching of the division towards the new area.

On 11 June 1941 the arrival of the 332 Infanteriedivision in the area of the 225 Infanteriedivision in the corps area of the Höheres Kommando XXXII was reported as running according to plan.

On 12 June 1941 it was reported the the relief of the 225 ID by the 332 ID was running according to plan in the area of the Höheres Kommando XXXII.

On 13 June 1941 the 332 Infanteriedivision had relieved the 225 Infanteriedivision and taken official command.in the area of the HK XXXII.

On 14 June 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivision moved its headquarters to Flixecourt.

On 15 June 1941 the division was still short of some 600 men, but was still predicted to be fully combat ready by July. Further on this dayn the division ordered the establishing of a Feldgendarmerietrupp 225 (1/6/14).

On 17 June 1941 the division released an order regarding the further training. The time that the division was stationed in its new billeting area was to be used for further training. The exact amount of time available for this could not be predicted. It was expected that, from 25 June onwards, 1 batallion in a weekly rotation, the Panzerjägerabteilung and parts of the Dinafü would be used to guard the Nordostlinie. A small change to this order was made on 23 June.

On 18 June 1941 the division issued an order for the Fall Auferstehung. In the case of kleine Auferstehung 2 cars, 26 trucks and 8 motorcycles could be made available for the increased mobility of some divisional units. In the event of grosse Auferstehung some units would be reinforced, but some also newly created. The latter included a Vorausabteilung (centered around the III/IR333) and a Radfahrkompanie. For making these units mobile other units were to shed their vehicles.

On 19 June 1941 the mass of the 225 Infanteriedivision had arrived in its new billeting area in the corps area of the HK XXXII.

On 21 June 1941 the 225 Infanteriedvision was reported to have arrived with all of its units. The headquarters of the division were located in Flixecourt.

On 22 June 1941 an AOK 9 order ordered the 225 Infanteriedivision to take over security duties at the Nordostlinie from the 93 Infanteriedivision from 27 June onwards.

On 23 June 1941 the division issued its own order for the security duty at the Nordostlinie. From 27 June onwards the the division would take over security from Ham to Valery-sur-Somme from the 93 Infanteriedivision. The stretch from Ham to Peronne would be taken over by the Radfahraufklärungsschwadron 225 with Stabsquartier in Peronne and from Peronne to St-Valery by the II/IR337 with Stabsquartier in Amiens.

On 24 June 1941 the division issued an order for the move of the IR 376 of the 225ID. After the IR 271 of the 93 ID had been transported off the IR 376 was to move in its former billeting area southwest of Amiens, with headquarters in Loeilly. The order was accompanied by a map showing the exact locations of the units of the division down to batallion level. The remainder of the division was stationed north and northwest of Amiens, as far west as Abbeville and as far north as Doullens.

On 25 June 1941 the 225 ID also took over the documents regarding Seelöwe and Auferstehung from the 93 ID.

On 27 June 1941 the guard duties at the Nordostlinie had all been transferred from the 93 ID to the 225 ID. At the Nordostlinie the division was now deployed as follows:

  • Sector Ham-Péronne: 4 Radfahrzüge/Radfahraufklärungsschwadron 225

  • Sectors Péronne, Amiens and Abbeville: Infanterieregiment 377

The 225 Infanteriedivision was to take over the sector from the 93 Infanteriedivision (Departement Somme). At this point in time however, units of the 225 ID  were still billeted in the sector of the IR 376. It was thus decided that the latter regiment would move to an area southwest of Amiens and would there take over the quarters of the IR 271 of the 93 ID.

Further on this day, an order was issued by the division regarding the allocation of the divisional units to the Truppenübungsplatz Sissonne.  

On 29 June 1941 the 225ID issued a follow-up order for the Fall Auferstehung (see 18 June above).

 

On 1 July 1941 the HK XXXII ordered the division, in the context of the securing of airfields against enemy air landings, to take up contact with the Flughafenbereich St-Omer for the airfield Abbeville-Drucat and with the Flughafenbereich Beauvais for the airfields of Amiens-Glisy and Poix, as well for the setting up of Jagdkomandos.

On 4 July 1941 the division issued an order regarding the motor vehicles allocated for grosse Auferstehung (see above). In view of the division's new task at the Nordostlinie the vehicles would have to be allocated to the Nordostlinie. Further on this day, an order was released for the establishing of mobile units and the combatting of airlanded enemy. In doing so part of an order of 2 May (see above) and 8 May was annulled.

On 6 July 1941, and in the context of the above order of 4 July, the division issued a list of airfields in or near areas occupied by units of the division: Abbeville-Drucat (IR377), Yvrench (IR377), Domqueur (IR377), Bernaville (III/AR225), Bertangles (IR333), Berneuil (IR333), Vignacourt (IR333), Valheureux (IR333), Amiens-Glisy (IR376), Poix (IR376). The regiments were also ordered to establish contact with the following Fliegerhorstkommandanturen: IR377 with the E 16/VI Abbeville-Drucat, IR333 with the 8/II (Boves), IR 376 with the 42/XI Poix and the 8/II in Boves. A very interesting document is the Anlage which provides a detailed overview of each of the above airfield (with commanders, flying units present and details of security units). This document has been processed below:

 

 

In the period 7-14 July 1941 the following units spent time training at the Truppenübungsplatz Sissonne: I/AR 225 (1-7 July), I/IR 333 (8-10 July), II/IR 333 (11-14 July)

On 11 July 1941 the division released a document containing remarks made by the division commander during this presence at the Truppenübungsplatz Sissonne. Further on this day, another order regarding the further training syllabus of the division was released. Also on this day, the divionsal commander felt the need to issue an order on (the lack of) discipline within the division

On 12 July 1941 the division stated that the AOK had ordered erhöhte Gefechtsbereitschaft for 13 and 14 July.

On 13 July 1941 the division issued an experience report on the creation of a Vorausabteilung (III/IR 333) on 7 July. Further on this day the division commander apparently felt the need to respond to the feeling of dissatisfaction within the division with the current (non-combattant) role the division was performing.

On 15 July 1941 this number had fallen further to some 350 men. Despite the fact that the division remained severely restricted in its mobility, not in the least due to petrol shortages, the division was declared combat ready. Also on this day the Infentarieregiment 376 took over guard duty at the Nordostlinie with its Stabskompanie and the I. Bataillon.

On 23 July 1941 the Pioniergeräteinspizient beim AOK15 inspected various engineer items with the Pionierbataillon 225. Also on this day the AOK15 commander Generaloberst Haase and the HK XXXII commander von Pogrell inspected units of the division. Further on this day the division commander issued an order with respect to the problem of sexually-transmitted diseases. The punishment for a soldier having contracted such a disease was no leave for 9 months and no promotion for 12 months.

Already on 24 July 1941 an overview of comments resulting from the inspection visit above was issued

On 25 July 1941 the division commander issued an overview of critical comments following from his presence during exercises.

On 26 July 1941 the division issued an order on combat shooting practice. Also on this day, the division ordered that the IR 333 was to relieve the units of the IR 376 deployed along the Nordostlinie on 29 and 30 July.

On 29-30 July 1941 the II/IR 333 relieved the I/IR 376 at the Nordostlinie.

 

On 1 August 1941 the division released another Auferstehung order. In fact, the earlier small and big Auferstehung no longer existed and were merged in 1 Aufterstehung Fall J. The new order reflected this change.

In the period 1-9 August 1941 the Stabsoffizier für Fahrtruppen beim AOK15, Hauptmann Bank, inspected the Fahrkolonnen of the division.

On 3 August 1941 the division ordered that some units had to be detached to the Kompanieführerschule Sissonne as Lehrtruppe. Involved were 1 battalion of the IR 376, an artillery battalion of the AR 225, an engineer companie and the 13/IR 333 and 14/IR 376. The order also mentions that security at the Nordostlinie would, in future, only be assumed by the IR 333 and the IR 377 with a 14-day rotation.

In the period 4-6 August 1941 the Stabsoffizier für Kraftfahrwesen beim AOK15, Oberst Gutknecht, inspected the motorized units of the division.

On 5 August 1941 the division issued an order on AA-defence with MG.

On 9 August 1941 the division ordered the relieving of the units of the IR 333 deployed at the Nordostlinie by units of the IR 377 on 14-15 August.

On 10 August 1941 an order was issued for closer cooperation between the infantry and the artillery.

In the period 14-15 August 1941 the III/IR 377 relieved the II/IR 333 at the Nordostlinie.

On 15 August 1941 the division was reported to be short of some 220 officers and NCOs, though the unit had more other ranks than the number to which it was theoretically entitled. Complaints were voiced about the poor state of the unit's vehicles (captured allied) and petrol shortages. Nevertheless, the division was declared fully combat ready.

On 18 August 1941 the division issued another order for the further training of the division. This was prompted by the partial non-observance of the order of 11 July above.

On 20 August 1941 the Panzerjägerabteilung 225 was transferred to Albert.

In the period 22-23 August 1941 the diviison took part in an important Planspiel at the corps headquarters in Rouen.

On 23 August 1941 the Armeekraftfahroffizier beil AOK15 submitted his inspection report to the division.

On 25 August 1941 the division ordered the relieving of the units of the IR 377 deployed at the Nordostlinie by units of the IR 333 on 28-29 August.

On 28 August 1941 the Stabsoffizier für Fahrtruppen beim AOK15 submitted his inspection report to the division.

On 29 August 1941 the III/IR 377 was relieved by the I/IR 333 at the Nordostlinie. Also on this day, the AOK15 ordered the division to build a Voraustabteilung in case of the division being transported out of the army area of command. Further on this day, the division commander issued his comments with respect to security duty at the Nordostlinie based on inspection vists.

On 30 August 1941 the division issued an order ordering measures to be taken to better protect special trains against attacks by the communist resistance.

 

On 4 September 1941 Oberst Lorenz was appointed as the commander for the Verladestab for the port of Rouen.

On 11 September 1941 the commander of the Panzerjägerabteilung 225, Oberstleutnant Finck, was transferred to the Führerreserve with immediate effect.

On 12 September 1941 the I/IR 377 relieved the I/IR 333 at the Nordostlinie.

By 15 September 1941 the shortage of troops had risen again to some 550; also the division was short of no fewer than 103 horses. As in many other cases, the 225 Infanteriedivision, too, complained about the poor state of its vehicle park, mostly captured from the allies and the lack of fuel for training purposes.

On 17 September 1941 the HK XXXII communicated that the commander of the Pionierbataillon 225, Oberstleutnant Schmidt. would be on secondment to inspect Maginot line defences in the period 25-29 September.

On 18 September 1941 the division issued an order that the division would NOT lose officers to the Russian front.

On 22 September 1941 the division issued an order for the relieving/deployment at the Nordostlinie. From 29 September parts of the IR 333 and the 1/ Panzerjägerabteilung 225 were to be deployed.

On 28 September 1941 the IR 377 was relieved at the Nordostlinie by the IR 333 and the 1/Panzerjägerabteilung 225.

 

On 13 October 1941 Oberst Lorentz is mentioned as the commander of the IR 376.

The status report of 15 October 1941 states an additional problem, namely the lack of reserve parts and tyres. More specifically, of the latter, only 10% of the quantity required was being delivered. Typically, though, this did not affect the full combatreadiness of the division.

On 18 October 1941 the diviison ordered that the Pionierbataillon was to be transferred to Corbie on 20/10. Its quarters were to be put at the disposal of the IR 377.  The IR 376 was also ordered to move its Stabskompanie to Longueau, close to Amiens.

On 21 October 1941 further transfer of units of the division were ordered: the Divisionsstab was to move to Amiens on 24/10; the Nachrichtenabteilung to Naours and Bussy-lèes-Naours on 25/10. Vacated quarters were to be surrendered to the infantry regiments. Also on this day, the division requested that the units of the diviison which has functioned as Lehrtruppe in Sissonne since 28/8 (III/IR376, II/AR225, 3/Pionierbataillon 225, 13/IR333 (ohne 1 Zug), 14/IR376 would be relieved after completion of the current course. Finally on this day, the AOK15 ordered the division to lose 3 Infanteriegeschützzüge for the benefit of the 319ID, which were to be sent to Granville.

On 22 October 1941 the OKH ordered that that division was to give off 44 NCOs with immediate effect.

On 23 October 1941 the HK XXXII informed the division about possible alarm situations with the incident code words.

On 25 October 1941 the division ordered the speedy withdrawal of the units engaged at the Nordostlinie, so that, in the event of an enemy landing, the division could fully fulfil its role as Eingreifdivision.

On 27 October 1941 the Divisionsstab moved its headquarters to Amiens.

On 28 October 1941 the request by the division (see 21/10 above) was refused. The units were to remain at Sissonne until 15 December.

On 29 October 1941 the II/IR333 was relieved by the iII/IR 337 at the Nordostlinie.

 

On 3 November 1941 the HK XXXII ordered that the Festungsbaubataillon 77 in Rouen had been given the mission of constructing bunkers at the coast. Initially, priority was to be given to shelters protection against air attack. Also on this day, the AOK15 ordered that the division was to lose its Panzerjägerabteilung, wich was to be transferred to the 319 ID in Granville.

On 4 November 1941 the AOK15 ordered that the sick AOK15 commander Haase was to be temporarily replaced by General der Artillerie Heitz.

On 8 November 1941 the Panzerjägerabteilung 225 left the area of the division.

On 9 November 1941 the AOK15 ordered that the IV/AR225 was to be lost and transfeerred to the 215 Infanteriedivision.

On 10 November 1941 the division ordered that, in view of the above unit losses, the security at the Nordostlinie was to be assured by one 1 bataillion of the division.

On 11 November 1941 acting in the context of increased British air attacks an an order from the HK XXXII, the diviison ordered measures to be taken to increase anri-air defences, on the one hand with increased use of MGs, on the other hand with cooperation with the Luftwaffe, notably the Flakuntergruppe Beauvais. The document also mentions the deployment of the latter within the area of the division: 1x 3.7cm battery at the Flugplatz Poix, 1 7.5cm battery and 1/2 2cm battery at the Flugplatz Abbeville-Drucat and 1/2 2cm battery at the Flugplatz Montdidier;

On 14 November 1941 the division was ordered to locate MF-firing positions for the defence against low-flying aircraft.

On 15 November 1941 the shortage of troops had strongly risen to almost 700, while the division was now also short of a whopping 214 horses. Not surprisingly then, the divisional commander's assessment of its capabilities was rather grim: the division, functioning as Armeereserve, was no longer capable of immediately sending a reinforced batallion in case of an emergency. More specifically, the division had lost 3 infantry companies, its entire Panzerjägerabteilung (to the 319ID) and one artillery batallion (to the 215ID). Also, while the division was only short of some 20 motorized vehicles, all of its 123 vehicles were either commercial or captured. As a direct result of this, the report states that it was no longer possible for the division to transfer a batallion that was still guarding the demarcation line to the coast in case of an emergency.

Also on this day, the II/IR377 was relieved by the I/IR333 at the Nordostlinie. Also on this day, it was reported that the 225 ID was to receive a capture British bridging unit.

On 16 November 1941 the division ordered increased observation and attentiveness for low-level air attacks and the fast possible use of MGs and guns.

On 19 November 1941 the commander of the Flakgruppe Beauveai (Flakregiment 431) contact the division and submitted information on the deployment of his units.

On 22 November 1941 the experience report concerning the loading and unloading exercises for Haifisch/Seelöwe ordered by the AOK15 were submitted.

On 24 November 1941 the division ordered the relieving of the bataillon at the Nordostlinie in the period 30/11-1/12.

On 26 November 1941 the division ordered the details for the relieving of the units making up the Lehrtruppe Sissonne after the end of the course.

 

On 1 December 1941 the I/IR333 was relieved by the III/IR 377 at the Nordostlinie.

On 4 December 1941 the HK XXXIII ordered that the Infanteriegeschützkompanien were to be kept ready to be lost, although each infantry regiment was to keep one platoon).

On 7 December 1941 the AOK15 ordered the transfer of the Infanteriegeschützkompanien of the diviison to the 81 Infanteriedivision.

On 12 December 1941 the AOK15 ordered the shedding of and transfer to the 246ID of 6 und 9/AR 225.

On 13 December 1941 the Infanteriegeschützkompanien were transported out of the area of the division as planned and transferred to the 81 ID

On 14 December 1941 the shedding and transfer to the 81ID of the Bäckereikompanie 225 was ordered.

On 15 December 1941 the personnel  situation of the division mentioned above had not improved much. Only the number of horses missing had dropped to 113. However, the report also states that the division was looking forward to receiving replacements, which would make the division fully combat ready.

On 16 December 1941 the 6 und 9/AR 225.left the area of the division. Also on this day, the division was notified that it was to be sent to the Russian front.

Finally on this day, the units of the 225 ID constituting the Lehrtruppe Sissonne returned to the division.

On 17 December 1941 the II/IR 333 relieved the III/IR 377 at the Nordostlinie. Also on this day, the HK XXXII ordered that the transport of the division was to start on 24 December.

On 18 December 1941 the division issued its 1. Befehl for the transport of the division to the East, followed by further orders on 19 December.

On 19 December 1941 the HK XXXII informed that the division that it would be transported by sea from East Prussia to Riga.

On 24 December 1941 the 225 Infanteriedivision began moving east.

 

At the end of December 1941 the division left for the Russian front. It was replaced in the KVA G by the 332 Infanteriedivision.

 

In December 1941 the division was rushed to the northern sector of the Russian front, mostly fighting around Leningrad. During the Russian winter offensive of January 1944 was forced to pull back and in October 1944 reached Kurland, taking part in all six Kurland battles until it finally went into Russian captivity at the end of the war.