african masksCleveland
Start ] Omhoog ] Virtual Museum ] African-Americans SF ] Chicago-ceramics ] Newark Museum ] Cleveland arms ] de Young-SF ] Museum of fine arts Boston ] Brooklyn Museum ] New Orleans Museum ] Detroit Institute DIA ] SAMA Artistry ] Museum for African Art ] Barbier-Mueller ] [ Cleveland ] Dallas-Museum-of-Arts ] Indianapolis ] Columbia-Urhobo ] NMAA Art-Treasures ] Baltimore-museum ] Dapper postcolonial ] Fine-arts-Houston ] Menil-Houston-Texas ] Louvres-Islamic art ] Minneapolis ] Metropolitan ] Israel Museum Jerusalem ] Orlando-Museum ] Cincinnati art museum ] Philadelphia-Museum ] Polk-Museum-of-Art ] african culture Portland ] Smithsonian-Washington ] SMA fathers New Jersey ] Tervueren ] UMKC-Belger Arts ] Whitman-New-Jersey ] West-Valley-Arizona ] Kunstkamera-Petersburg ] Ethnology-Vienna ] Irma-Stern-Museum ] Appleton museum Ocala ] UCLA-Fowler ] Benin Museum ] Weltkulture ] DuSable Museum ] Cuba museum ] fineartshouston ] Bowers museum ] Museu Afro Brazil ] airport art ] Nelson Atkins ] Zora Neale ] branly museum ] Longyear museum ] Douglas society Denver ] Denver art museum ] Centre Black African Civilization ] charles wright ] Seattle Art Museum ] Samuel Dorsky ] High museum Atlanta ]

A fine Eastern Pende Panya-Gombe African mask. Coll.: David Norden

African Art books I like | Genuine African Masks

Cleveland

The Cleveland Museum of Art 
11150 East Boulevard 
Cleveland, Ohio 44106 
216-421-7340 
Google  

View also the Cleveland Museum collection pieces  The Cleveland Museum of Art permanent collection includes more than 35000 objects.

Gallery of Sub-Saharan African Art 

October 12, 2003 - December 31, 2005

Image of Plaque, possibly 1500s–mid 1600sNigeria, Benin Kingdom, Edo people Brass John L. Severance Fund, 1999.1Completely refurbished, this new gallery showcases the Museum's finest examples of art from Africa, south of the Sahara with 62 objects in wood, terracotta, brass, ivory, cloth and other media on view. The majority of works are wooden masks and figures made in West and Central Africa in the late 19th to early 20th centuries.

Admission to this gallery and the museum is free.

Plaque, possibly 1500s–mid 1600s
Nigeria, Benin Kingdom, Edo people
Brass
John L. Severance Fund, 1999.1

The gallery is organized geographically with a division in four broad cultural regions: Western Sudan, Guinea Coast, Nigeria and the Congo Basin.

Objects from the same culture are shown together and contrasted with those of their neighbors.

This arrangement illustrates the formal and stylistic relationships between neighboring artistic traditions and emphasizes the uniqueness of the arts of distinct peoples.

The cultural regions are marked in the gallery by four free-standing cases containing a single work of art that may be viewed from all sides.

Image of Mother-and-Child Figure, 1800s–1900s Ivory Coast, Senufo people. Wood .James Albert and Mary Gardiner Ford Memorial Fund 1961.198Mother-and-Child Figure, 1800s–1900s
Ivory Coast, Senufo people
Wood
James Albert and Mary Gardiner Ford
Memorial Fund 1961.198

Mother-and-child figure

Among the Fodonon Senufo subgroup, mother-and-child figures are related to the female Tyekpa association and play a role in funerary ceremonies in which they are carried on the participating women’s heads.

The four-legged stool on which the figure sits is much easier to balance on the heads of the dancing women. However, among the Central Senufo, similar female figures were used as stationary display sculpture for the male Poro society.

In the context of the Poro and its female counterpart, mother-and-child figures probably refer to “Ancient Mother,” the central deity of the Poro initiation cycle. She is responsible for the protection and instruction of the initiates, which are her “children,” nursing them with the milk of knowledge and thus transforming them into perfect human beings.


A feature of the new Sub-Saharan African Gallery is a large touch-screen interactive focused on the museum's Ejagham headdress. This interactive was produced by Associate Curator of African Art, Constantine Petridis, and his colleague Amanda Carlson - a Cleveland native who specialized in the arts of the Cross River region.

Carlson's field videos have also allowed the museum to introduce the dynamic performance context that is so characteristic of much African art into the static display of the museum gallery. Even more innovative in an art museum context, Amanda's additional fieldwork on Ejagham-derived traditions in Cuba and the United States have made it possible to explore the presence of African art and culture in the Americas.

Watch Video High Bandwidth Low Bandwidth

Skin-covered cap or crest masks, made of fresh, uncured antelope skin stretched over a softwood carved head, are a distinctive naturalistic art form of the Cross River region in the southeastern part of Nigeria and western Cameroon. This realistic headdress depicts a woman's head with a long neck, rounded facial features, realistically rendered teeth of strips of cane, and a faithful imitation of a horned coiffure. The wickerwork skullcap at the base of the neck would have been secured on the masquerader's head by a string under his chin, and his body entirely covered by a long gown. That such headdresses were originally covered with human skin is not impossible given that they are said to represent heads of enemies killed during wars, and thus attest to their owners' exceptional powers.

The style of the Cleveland headdress is characteristic of the lower Cross River region, in or around the town of Calabar in Nigeria. Skin-covered headdresses were indeed used in different secret societies of the region among various peoples. The elaborate hairstyle with curving "horns" and the head's facial features indicate that this headdress was most probably worn by a woman in the context of the Ekpa, a society of Ejagham women that was responsible for the education of the girls in preparation for marriage. The headdress could represent a girl who embodies ideal female beauty and is ready for marriage. The hairstyle depicted was actually worn during the coming-out ceremony following the girls' seclusion in the "fattening house."

In a striking example of the African diaspora to the New World, the culture of the Ejagham and their Efut and Efik neighbors is closely related to that of the male Abakua society in northwestern Cuba. The elders of this Abakua society consider skin a charm that allows the capture and control of the spirits of the dead.

Extracted from:
Petridis, Constantine. South of the Sahara: Selected Works of African Art. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art, 2003.

Product image for ASIN: 094071776X South of the Sahara: Selected Works of African Art
Author: Constantine Petridis; Buy New: $18.90
 

buy african masks
African masks from Known Collections

African Antiques Newsletter

Build Your Dream Collection !

I never thought I would receive so much information's about the African art world !
Free Newletter.
Subscribe today : 

Free African Art Authenticity Report
 

 

african art on facebookDear African Art Collectors,

Discover the African Art books I like or join me on facebook

African Antiques is the archive and not growing much anymore but still updated.

Visit African Art to join our free newsletter and read recent African Art News.

For the last news about  Cleveland you should join our African Art Club and become an insider of the African art market.

And if you are a collector of African Art, have a look at our exclusive African Art Collection for sale.

David Norden


Mail David Norden
Sint-katelijnevest 27
ANTWERPEN-Belgium

Any questions?
Call us at +
32 3 227 35 40

african art | home | african art shop

In this section:
Start
Omhoog
Virtual Museum
African-Americans SF
Chicago-ceramics
Newark Museum
Cleveland arms
de Young-SF
Museum of fine arts Boston
Brooklyn Museum
New Orleans Museum
Detroit Institute DIA
SAMA Artistry
Museum for African Art
Barbier-Mueller
Cleveland
Dallas-Museum-of-Arts
Indianapolis
Columbia-Urhobo
NMAA Art-Treasures
Baltimore-museum
Dapper postcolonial
Fine-arts-Houston
Menil-Houston-Texas
Louvres-Islamic art
Minneapolis
Metropolitan
Israel Museum Jerusalem
Orlando-Museum
Cincinnati art museum
Philadelphia-Museum
Polk-Museum-of-Art
african culture Portland
Smithsonian-Washington
SMA fathers New Jersey
Tervueren
UMKC-Belger Arts
Whitman-New-Jersey
West-Valley-Arizona
Kunstkamera-Petersburg
Ethnology-Vienna
Irma-Stern-Museum
Appleton museum Ocala
UCLA-Fowler
Benin Museum
Weltkulture
DuSable Museum
Cuba museum
fineartshouston
Bowers museum
Museu Afro Brazil
airport art
Nelson Atkins
Zora Neale
branly museum
Longyear museum
Douglas society Denver
Denver art museum
Centre Black African Civilization
charles wright
Seattle Art Museum
Samuel Dorsky
High museum Atlanta 

African art books

The Tribal Arts of Africa

The Tribal Arts of Africa
Author: Jean-Baptiste Bacquart

more African Art books I like


read also : Start ] Virtual Museum ] African-Americans SF ] Chicago-ceramics ] Newark Museum ] Cleveland arms ] de Young-SF ] Museum of fine arts Boston ] Brooklyn Museum ] New Orleans Museum ] Detroit Institute DIA ] SAMA Artistry ] Museum for African Art ] Barbier-Mueller ] [ Cleveland ] Dallas-Museum-of-Arts ] Indianapolis ] Columbia-Urhobo ] NMAA Art-Treasures ] Baltimore-museum ] Dapper postcolonial ] Fine-arts-Houston ] Menil-Houston-Texas ] Louvres-Islamic art ] Minneapolis ] Metropolitan ] Israel Museum Jerusalem ] Orlando-Museum ] Cincinnati art museum ] Philadelphia-Museum ] Polk-Museum-of-Art ] african culture Portland ] Smithsonian-Washington ] SMA fathers New Jersey ] Tervueren ] UMKC-Belger Arts ] Whitman-New-Jersey ] West-Valley-Arizona ] Kunstkamera-Petersburg ] Ethnology-Vienna ] Irma-Stern-Museum ] Appleton museum Ocala ] UCLA-Fowler ] Benin Museum ] Weltkulture ] DuSable Museum ] Cuba museum ] fineartshouston ] Bowers museum ] Museu Afro Brazil ] airport art ] Nelson Atkins ] Zora Neale ] branly museum ] Longyear museum ] Douglas society Denver ] Denver art museum ] Centre Black African Civilization ] charles wright ] Seattle Art Museum ] Samuel Dorsky ] High museum Atlanta ]

Buy David Norden's African Antiques | AA group English | AA Français | Privacy & Earning disclaimer | Become our partner |  The African Antiques newsletter | African Art Club | facebook african art

 mail David Norden phone +32 3 227.35.40