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A fine Eastern Pende Panya-Gombe African mask. Coll.: David Norden

African Art books I like | Genuine African Masks

Indianapolis

IMA—Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road
Indianapolis IN 46208-3326
Tel: 317-920-2660
ima*ima-art.org
curator is Ted Celenko

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read also: Indianapolis renovations 

Idoma - IndianapolisIdoma . Ochai of the village of Otobi
Ritual headpiece with two janus-faced heads

Indianapolis Museum of Arts, presents:

Cycles: African Life Through Art (click for the interactive teacher resource)

Posted March 07, 2005 at http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0307/p25s01-stin.html

By Jim Regan | csmonitor.com

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA - While art exhibits are most commonly arranged around such themes as period, movement, or specific masters, it can also be edifying to view works in their cultural context - mixing a bit of anthropology with the art appreciation. And if you're deciding on a cultural framework, you can't go bigger than the entire sweep of life - from birth through adulthood and eventually, beyond. (Perhaps occupying a new position as someone else's 'ancestor.')

Cycles: African Life Through Art views its subject through the lens of life and at the end, leaves the visitor back where they started, '...and knowing the place for the first time.'

Hosted by the Indianapolis Museum of Art (and a practical example of the advantages of Web companions for physical exhibits), Cycles remains accessible while the corporeal museum awaits the construction of a new home. Launched last year, and a current nominee for a South by Southwest Interactive Festival Web Award, the site features artifacts from ancient to modern, and draws the visitor in with a vibrantly colored splash page, and an introduction that uses animation, text and music to outline the exhibition's intent. Once loaded, the menu page displays the four topics around which the exhibition is arranged; Ancestors, Youth, Adulthood, and Leadership.

As an exercise in design, the creators at Terra Incognita have done an admirable job of keeping the circular/cycles theme intact while dealing with a rectangular computer screen. The categories are separated into the four quadrants of the browser window, around a central disk with additional links to an exhibition Gallery and Glossary (complete with audio clips to demonstrate proper pronunciation of unfamiliar terms).

Choose one of the four main sections, and that quadrant enlarges to occupy most of the screen, but leaves the edges of adjacent categories visible at the frame's borders - which encourages cyclical exploration, and even a return to section one after having viewed the entire exhibition. The central disk always remains visible (to anchor the changing quadrants, and to allow an immediate return to the home page), while concentric arcs of links at the inner and outer edges of the screen maintain access to site-wide and category-specific contents.

In terms of that content, all four sections open with a brief introduction and a relevant proverb. ("An adult squatting sees farther than a child on top of a tree.") Each section has three or four 'chapters' arranged around the central disk, displaying one or two interactive artifacts linked to detail views, text background and audio commentaries by Naeemah Jackson, a curator of African art at the IMA who also wrote the site's content. In the outside corner of the frame, a thumbnail map of the African continent displays the geographic origin of the current artifact, while a Zoom link will open a new page with the option of viewing the object in extreme detail.

For those who want to step out of the circle, the site also offers more direct ways to explore the exhibit. Clicking on the map of Africa or the Gallery link (both always available while exploring the four quadrants), reveals all the artifacts available in the online exhibit on a single page, which can be either highlighted by region or displayed as a complete collection. Each of these artifacts can then be opened into their own page, where visitors have access to text descriptions, and the ability to zoom into the object to extraordinary levels of detail. (The maximum magnification for an image of a "Sowei mask" was such that I could actually see the dimpled patterns on the heads of some small nails.)

These single artifact pages also link back to the Cycle themed page on which they are featured, and while lacking the extreme close-ups, the smaller images on the Cycle pages frequently offer other enhancements. (Extra features include highlighted explorations of specific parts of the artifacts and, in the case of the Sowei mask, the ability to rotate the object 360 degrees.)

And lessons aren't limited to the historical and/or cultural background behind specific objects. A section exploring "Clothes as Symbols" opens with a traditional skirt worn by Iraqw girls of East Africa, and then draws parallels with examples more familiar to Western viewers, such as graduation caps and confirmation dresses. Similarly, an introduction to the "Akuba" (a representation of a child often carried in anticipation of childbirth) segues to a brief treatment of the artistic choices between realism and abstraction, while "Art Out of Context" addresses the limitations of placing artifacts into museum settings.

Graphics and colors keep the eye entertained throughout the visit, and auto-playing music and singing add life to the presentation. But while the pages loaded quickly enough, there seems to be a good deal of processor activity going on behind the scenes, as my old computer's reaction times were lagging while at the site. (No doubt, more up to date processors will show no evidence of such difficulties.)

Like most in its genre, this isn't an exceptionally comprehensive site (the entire presentation consists of 19 pieces), but there's plenty here to match most Web-based attention spans, presented in a manner that shows imagination in both the curatorial and design approaches to the subject matter.

"Cycles: African Life Through Art" can be found at http://www.ima-art.org/cycles/index.html.

Africa is one of the most culturally diverse regions of the world, and its approximately 3,000 ethnic groups represent distinct cultural traditions. Accordingly, the IMA collection encompasses art from throughout the continent—from Mali and Côte d'Ivoire in the west to Ethiopia and Kenya in the east, and from Egypt and Morocco in the north to Zimbabwe in the south. Art from the northern part of the continent is a significant feature of the Museum's African gallery, which also showcases art throughout time, from ancient Egyptian and Nubian pieces to works created by contemporary artists for today's global market. The gallery also features an orientation video that explores basic themes of African art, maps and informational labels, and videos that show how key objects are made and used in Africa.

Twins Seven Seven, Healing of the Abiku ChildrenTwins Seven Seven
(Taiwo Olaniyi Oyewale) (b. 1944)
Yoruba people
Nigeria
Western Africa

Healing of the Abiku Children, 1973
wood, paint, ink, varnish, 51 3/8 x 51 9/16 in.
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Eiteljorg 1993.8

In Yoruba belief, abiku refers to a child who dies shortly after birth and is reborn several times into the same family. To halt this cycle of death and rebirth, mothers take their children to a divination priest. In this picture, a mother has brought twins to the priest, who is seated in the structure behind the mother. Other women assist in the ritual. The artist is the only survivor of seven sets of twins, the story behind the popular name by which he is known. He began his career in a workshop for artists in Nigeria in the 1960s and is now known internationally for his art and his flamboyant personality. His style as an artist is exemplified in this early work. The entire surface is covered from edge to edge, and intricate abstract patterns fill the background and the space within the outlines of the figures.

Senufo people, female ancestor figureSenufo people
Côte d'Ivoire
Western Africa

female ancestor figure, early 20th century
wood, 41 5/8 in 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Crane Fund, Richard M. Fairbanks Endowed Art Fund, Mary Black Fund, Lucille Stewart Endowed Art Fund, Mrs. Pierre F. Goodrich Endowed Art Fund, General Endowed Art Fund 1999.31


Imposing and dignified, this carved figure embodies the original female ancestor-the first woman—who with her male counterpart is central to Senufo beliefs about ancestry. While they usually were kept in a shrine, the figures were sometimes carried in funeral processions, where the dead were initiated into the world of ancestral spirits and family ancestors were remembered. They were swung from side to side and even struck on the ground during the procession, serving as musical instruments accompanied by horns and drums. This figure wears a typical Senufo hairstyle, a waist garment and armlets, and scarification markings on her head and body. Her prominent breasts signify a woman in the prime of life. The feet and the base of the figure are missing, possibly because of water or insect damage.

Iraqw people, girl's skirt. Indianapolis
Iraqw people
Tanzania
Eastern Africa

girl's skirt, 20th century
leather, glass beads, metal, 35 x 67 1/2 in

Textile Arts Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Van Vorhees Art Fund, The Richard C. Vonnegut Endowment Fund in memory of Louise A. Vonnegut Peirce and Gift of Mrs. Bernice Fee Mozingo, Helen W. Russell, Mrs. Louise Burkhardt, Mrs. Sylvia Orell in memory of Colonel and Mrs. F. J. Keelty, and Ruth Grummon by exchange
1998.77

Skirts similar to this are worn at the close of female initiation ceremonies, part of the process for girls around 14 years old who are learning the responsibilities they will have as adult women. During the initiation period, they design and create skirts that will accentuate their grace and elegance when they appear at the ceremonies. The overall design of this skirt is characteristic of Eastern Africa. Linear patterns are balanced with curved shapes, and the irregular placement creates a sense of movement and energy. The bright colors and fringed edges contribute to the powerful effect of the skirt when the wearer walks or dances....Going down to the second floor, you come to the most recent re-opening (Feb. 5), the Eiteljorg Galleries of African and South Pacific Art.

read also 

Indianapolis Museum of Art renovations

...Most of the 12,251 square feet of space is devoted to African art -- a total of 400 works, including 30 pieces that have never been shown in the gallery...

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African art books

The Tribal Arts of Africa

The Tribal Arts of Africa
Author: Jean-Baptiste Bacquart

more African Art books I like


read also : Start ] Virtual Museum ] African-Americans SF ] Chicago-ceramics ] Newark Museum ] Cleveland arms ] de Young-SF ] Museum of fine arts Boston ] Brooklyn Museum ] New Orleans Museum ] Detroit Institute DIA ] SAMA Artistry ] Museum for African Art ] Barbier-Mueller ] Cleveland ] Dallas-Museum-of-Arts ] [ Indianapolis ] Columbia-Urhobo ] NMAA Art-Treasures ] Baltimore-museum ] Dapper postcolonial ] Fine-arts-Houston ] Menil-Houston-Texas ] Louvres-Islamic art ] Minneapolis ] Metropolitan ] Israel Museum Jerusalem ] Orlando-Museum ] Cincinnati art museum ] Philadelphia-Museum ] Polk-Museum-of-Art ] african culture Portland ] Smithsonian-Washington ] SMA fathers New Jersey ] Tervueren ] UMKC-Belger Arts ] Whitman-New-Jersey ] West-Valley-Arizona ] Kunstkamera-Petersburg ] Ethnology-Vienna ] Irma-Stern-Museum ] Appleton museum Ocala ] UCLA-Fowler ] Benin Museum ] Weltkulture ] DuSable Museum ] Cuba museum ] fineartshouston ] Bowers museum ] Museu Afro Brazil ] airport art ] Nelson Atkins ] Zora Neale ] branly museum ] Longyear museum ] Douglas society Denver ] Denver art museum ] Centre Black African Civilization ] charles wright ] Seattle Art Museum ] Samuel Dorsky ] High museum Atlanta ]

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