african masksKansan-Yoruba-Masquerade
Start ] Omhoog ] Africa Monaco ] Centers for African Study ] Wake-Forest University ] Malcolm Woods headstones ] Virginia Museum of fine arts ] Unfa-Utah ] Cantor Arts-Stanford ] carlosemory ] Umfa-Utah ] Seymour Lazar collectionneur et Art Africain ] Harn Museum-florida ] UMMA-collection ] Haffenreffer-ethnographic ] [ Kansan-Yoruba-Masquerade ] Lowe-art-Miami ] Neuberger ] Queens-NY ] Hofstra Museum NY ] Texas-Southern-University ] Washington Jefferson College ] Frankfort-Indiana ] Delaware ] Hood Museum ] Yale ] Barton-Museum ] Southern-University-Suma ] Loyola-New-Orleans-University ] Speed ] Virginia-University-Museum ] Chambers UCO-Edmond-OK ] Brown University ] Colgate university ] spurlock illinois ] Fowler UCLA ] Sacramento state university ] Kent state ] Virginia Art Museum ] Hofstra University Museum ] Wabash college ]

A fine Eastern Pende Panya-Gombe African mask. Coll.: David Norden

African Art books I like | Genuine African Masks

Last dance of semester turns Kansan in a Yoruba Masquerade

Curtis McCoy, DesMoines Iowa Senior, is a masquerader representing a native african doctor in the Yoruban Society. McCoy participated in the masquerade as part of a grade for Gitti Salami's Introduction to African Art class. (Ginny Weatherman/KANSAN)

Google  

By Nikola Rowe Kansan staff writer found at University Daily Kansan - Lawrence,KS,USA

Salami, assistant professor of art history and African-American studies, found the tunnel when she first interviewed at the University of Kansas.

“I was taken through the tunnel and I knew it would be a great place for a performance,” Salami said.

In the middle of the tunnel, paper wrapped around five brick pillars. Behind the paper was a mysterious being that represented female energy, which was played by Monica Gundelfinger, Prairie Village sophomore, and Adrianne Verhoeven, Kansas City, Mo., junior. They tried to coax out the spirit of health by dancing, singing and getting the audience involved with the noise-making.

“It was exhilarating,” Gundelfinger said. “You could feel the energy from the audience.”

Students, staff and community members filled the tunnel. Some jangled their car keys and joined the spirits in evoking the health spirit out of hiding. Verhoeven said she didn’t just do this for the class, that she wanted to do it.

What the professor liked best about the performance was that the group members were able to convey the difference between a masquerade and a theatrical or dance performance, she said. Masquerading is a genre of art that doesn’t really exist anywhere else except in Africa, she said. The assignment was not just to perform an African masquerade, but also to study the art and create a unique performance. Salami felt that the group was successful in creating a masquerade that related to the students’ struggles.

“It was beyond my expectations,” Salami said. 

A masquerade shows that the tangible world and the spirit world are connected, Mocha Jackson, a senior from Kansas City, Kan., said. Jackson took Salami’s class to learn more about African art but now knows more about African culture as well.

“You can’t talk about the art without talking about the culture,” Jackson said.

The next portion of the masquerade included a muse spirit struggling with the spirits of weariness and time. The students thought that these were two things that kept creativity from happening, Salami said.

Mark Olson, curator in the art history department, said he attended because he received an e-mail from Salami and thought the project sounded interesting.

“It was a great idea for no other reason than the acoustics in here are great,” Olson said.

His wife, Stephanie, home schools and brought their 5-year old daughter, Annie, and Calred Holond, 5, to see the performance. 

“I thought it would be cool for the kids to see,” Stephanie Olson said.

The girls clapped and danced along with the performers and enjoyed picking up the parts of the costumes that were left behind.

— Edited by Paige Worthy
The University Daily Kansan and Kansan.com are produced by students at the University of Kansas' William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications.
Copyright © The University Daily Kansan 1996-2003. All rights reserved. 

To read more University news related to african art, browse through the links above the page.

buy african masks
African masks from Known Collections

African Antiques Newsletter

Build Your Dream Collection !

I never thought I would receive so much information's about the African art world !
Free Newletter.
Subscribe today : 

Free African Art Authenticity Report
 

 

african art on facebookDear African Art Collectors,

Discover the African Art books I like or join me on facebook

African Antiques is the archive and not growing much anymore but still updated.

Visit African Art to join our free newsletter and read recent African Art News.

For the last news about  Kansan-Yoruba-Masquerade you should join our African Art Club and become an insider of the African art market.

And if you are a collector of African Art, have a look at our exclusive African Art Collection for sale.

David Norden


Mail David Norden
Sint-katelijnevest 27
ANTWERPEN-Belgium

Any questions?
Call us at +
32 3 227 35 40

african art | home | african art shop

In this section:
Start
Omhoog
Africa Monaco
Centers for African Study
Wake-Forest University
Malcolm Woods headstones
Virginia Museum of fine arts
Unfa-Utah
Cantor Arts-Stanford
carlosemory
Umfa-Utah
Seymour Lazar collectionneur et Art Africain
Harn Museum-florida
UMMA-collection
Haffenreffer-ethnographic
Kansan-Yoruba-Masquerade
Lowe-art-Miami
Neuberger
Queens-NY
Hofstra Museum NY
Texas-Southern-University
Washington Jefferson College
Frankfort-Indiana
Delaware
Hood Museum
Yale
Barton-Museum
Southern-University-Suma
Loyola-New-Orleans-University
Speed
Virginia-University-Museum
Chambers UCO-Edmond-OK
Brown University
Colgate university
spurlock illinois
Fowler UCLA
Sacramento state university
Kent state
Virginia Art Museum
Hofstra University Museum
Wabash college 

African art books

The Tribal Arts of Africa

The Tribal Arts of Africa
Author: Jean-Baptiste Bacquart

more African Art books I like


read also : Start ] Africa Monaco ] Centers for African Study ] Wake-Forest University ] Malcolm Woods headstones ] Virginia Museum of fine arts ] Unfa-Utah ] Cantor Arts-Stanford ] carlosemory ] Umfa-Utah ] Seymour Lazar collectionneur et Art Africain ] Harn Museum-florida ] UMMA-collection ] Haffenreffer-ethnographic ] [ Kansan-Yoruba-Masquerade ] Lowe-art-Miami ] Neuberger ] Queens-NY ] Hofstra Museum NY ] Texas-Southern-University ] Washington Jefferson College ] Frankfort-Indiana ] Delaware ] Hood Museum ] Yale ] Barton-Museum ] Southern-University-Suma ] Loyola-New-Orleans-University ] Speed ] Virginia-University-Museum ] Chambers UCO-Edmond-OK ] Brown University ] Colgate university ] spurlock illinois ] Fowler UCLA ] Sacramento state university ] Kent state ] Virginia Art Museum ] Hofstra University Museum ] Wabash college ]

Buy David Norden's African Antiques | AA group English | AA Français | Privacy & Earning disclaimer | Become our partner |  The African Antiques newsletter | African Art Club | facebook african art

 mail David Norden phone +32 3 227.35.40