african masksUmfa-Utah
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A fine Eastern Pende Panya-Gombe African mask. Coll.: David Norden

African Art books I like | Genuine African Masks

Umfa Museum of fine Arts - Utah

Glin mask Umfa UtahUtah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah 
410 Campus Center Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0350
801-581-7332 
umfa utah african art 

Ivory Coast, Baulé people
Glin Mask, Goli or Guli Masquerade
Wood and pigment
The Ulfert Wilke Collection, purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum # 1982.001.001
read also:  UMFA-Arts of a Continent The Utah Museum of Fine Arts offers a stuning primitive-art exhibition                  free public Juneteenth celebration and African art finds a home in Utah
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and Owen Mort or African Art collection listing at UMFA

Baulé Art

The Baulé people live in central Ivory Coast (Côte d’Ivoire). A subgroup of the Akan people, they originally lived in Ghana. Three hundred years ago they migrated west into the Ivory Coast area when their queen, Aura Poku, contended for power with the king of the Asante people (also a subgroup of the Akan group). After the Asante king won, she led her people into the land they now occupy. The Baulé are an agrarian people who grow yam, manioc and maize. Their society is matrilineal, meaning descent is traced through one’s mother. Their social structure consists of small groups under the leadership of a king or queen. 



Chokwe Art

Umfa Utah Chokwe Chair

he Chokwe live in the southwestern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). The Chokwe grow manioc, cassava, yams, peanuts and maize (to make beer). The Chokwe acknowledge allegiance to chiefs who inherit their position from maternal uncles. 

Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire), Chokwe people
Chief's Chair
Wood and metal brads
Partial gift of Owen D. Mort, Jr. for the Owen D. Mort, Jr. Collection of African Art, with additional funds from the George S. and Dolores DorŽ Eccles Foundation
Museum # 1985.052.809

Dan Art

The Dan live in Liberia and the Ivory Coast (Côte d’Ivoire). While they lacked a cohesive central government, identity as a Dan was fostered by a shared language and intermarriage within the language group. Today men make their living at wage work in the diamond camps or working at the rubber plantations instead of the more traditional farming and hunting. What has remained is the demonstration of success through the competition by young men to see who can spend more lavishly at community feasts. The Dan place a high value on the individual’s ability to succeed and consider such demonstrations of wealth as proof of achievements. 


Igbo Art

The Igbo live in southeast Nigeria. The Igbo still farm with the staple crop being yams. A cash crop is provided through the harvesting of the fruit of the palm tree and the processing of it into palm oil that they export. Leadership is vested in a village council that includes the heads of families, elders and men viewed as important contributors to the society. 


Kuba Art

The Kuba live in the southeastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo and are part of a large complex of tribes encompassing 18 ethnic groups all dominated by the BuShongo, the ruling group. They grow manioc, corn, millet, beans and groundnuts and hunt extensively. The Kuba are matrilineal so descent is traced through one’s mother, but they are patrilocal so that children reside with their father. Their political system consists of a king who presides over a council made up of representatives of various kin groups and trade guilds. Under them are various administrative officials. Under colonialism, the kingdom was largely broken up by the late 19th century. 

Pende Art

The Pende people live in the southwest part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). Originally from the area of modern-day Angola they were forced north in 1620 by the expansion of the Lunda people. In 1885 the expansion of the Chokwe people overwhelmed most of the eastern Pende and extended into the western groups. The rise of colonialism halted this incursion and the Pende regained their cultural unity. 

The Pende are divided into the eastern, centUMFA UTAH Pende Kiphogo maskral and Kwilu Pende. Although each group is culturally distinct they consider themselves as one people. 

The Pende are an agrarian people who grow millet, maize, plantain, and peanuts. While it is women who do most of the farm work, the men help to clear the fields and supplement the diet by hunting and fishing. 

Democratic Republic of Congo, (formerly Zaire), Pende people
Kiphogo (Giphogo) Mask
Wood and pigment
Museum # 1983.001.003

Salampasu Art

UMFA Utah Salampasu Mukinka Mask The Salampasu people live in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). They are grouped in a loose confederation of villages headed by chiefs. The Salampasu have a highly stratified society with initiation ceremonies playing vital roles in maintaining the social system. The Salampasu live mostly from hunting, but the women do some farming. 

Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire), Salampasu people
Mukinka Mask
Wood, copper, split cane, twine and traces of pigment
Partial gift of Owen D. Mort, Jr. for the Owen D. Mort, Jr. Collection of African Art, with additional funds from the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation
Museum # 1985.052.941

Songye and Luba Art

The Songye and Luba peoples live in the southeastern area of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Both groups trace their origins to a common mythic ancestor, Kongolo, and they are related linguistically. As with many African groups, the Songye and Luba rely on farming, supplementing their diet with hunting. Since rivers were the sacred homes of spirits and their chiefs were buried in them

read also:

Owen Mort Out of Africa

Thanks to Owen Mort, Utah Museum of Fine Arts can showcase “Arts of a Continent. ”African art from the permanent collection returns for public viewing at UMFA. The exhibition, Africa: Arts of a Continent, is a permanent rotating exhibition, and includes several new acquisitions never seen before by the public. Africa: Arts of a Continent focuses on four cultures: the Dogon of Mali, the Baulé of the Ivory Coast, the Yoruba of Nigeria and the Kuba Kingdom of the Congo. Africa: Arts of a Continent also incorporates several ancient Egyptian burial objects from various dynasties and explores the importance of the Nile.

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Omhoog
Africa Monaco
Centers for African Study
Wake-Forest University
Malcolm Woods headstones
Virginia Museum of fine arts
Unfa-Utah
Cantor Arts-Stanford
carlosemory
Umfa-Utah
Seymour Lazar collectionneur et Art Africain
Harn Museum-florida
UMMA-collection
Haffenreffer-ethnographic
Kansan-Yoruba-Masquerade
Lowe-art-Miami
Neuberger
Queens-NY
Hofstra Museum NY
Texas-Southern-University
Washington Jefferson College
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Hood Museum
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Barton-Museum
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Loyola-New-Orleans-University
Speed
Virginia-University-Museum
Chambers UCO-Edmond-OK
Brown University
Colgate university
spurlock illinois
Fowler UCLA
Sacramento state university
Kent state
Virginia Art Museum
Hofstra University Museum
Wabash college 

African art books

The Tribal Arts of Africa

The Tribal Arts of Africa
Author: Jean-Baptiste Bacquart

more African Art books I like


read also : Start ] Africa Monaco ] Centers for African Study ] Wake-Forest University ] Malcolm Woods headstones ] Virginia Museum of fine arts ] Unfa-Utah ] Cantor Arts-Stanford ] carlosemory ] [ Umfa-Utah ] Seymour Lazar collectionneur et Art Africain ] Harn Museum-florida ] UMMA-collection ] Haffenreffer-ethnographic ] Kansan-Yoruba-Masquerade ] Lowe-art-Miami ] Neuberger ] Queens-NY ] Hofstra Museum NY ] Texas-Southern-University ] Washington Jefferson College ] Frankfort-Indiana ] Delaware ] Hood Museum ] Yale ] Barton-Museum ] Southern-University-Suma ] Loyola-New-Orleans-University ] Speed ] Virginia-University-Museum ] Chambers UCO-Edmond-OK ] Brown University ] Colgate university ] spurlock illinois ] Fowler UCLA ] Sacramento state university ] Kent state ] Virginia Art Museum ] Hofstra University Museum ] Wabash college ]

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