african masksUMKC-Belger Arts
Start ] Omhoog ] Virtual Museum ] African-Americans SF ] Chicago-ceramics ] Newark Museum ] Cleveland arms ] de Young-SF ] Museum of fine arts Boston ] Brooklyn Museum ] New Orleans Museum ] Detroit Institute DIA ] SAMA Artistry ] Museum for African Art ] Barbier-Mueller ] Cleveland ] Dallas-Museum-of-Arts ] Indianapolis ] Columbia-Urhobo ] NMAA Art-Treasures ] Baltimore-museum ] Dapper postcolonial ] Fine-arts-Houston ] Menil-Houston-Texas ] Louvres-Islamic art ] Minneapolis ] Metropolitan ] Israel Museum Jerusalem ] Orlando-Museum ] Cincinnati art museum ] Philadelphia-Museum ] Polk-Museum-of-Art ] african culture Portland ] Smithsonian-Washington ] SMA fathers New Jersey ] Tervueren ] [ UMKC-Belger Arts ] Whitman-New-Jersey ] West-Valley-Arizona ] Kunstkamera-Petersburg ] Ethnology-Vienna ] Irma-Stern-Museum ] Appleton museum Ocala ] UCLA-Fowler ] Benin Museum ] Weltkulture ] DuSable Museum ] Cuba museum ] fineartshouston ] Bowers museum ] Museu Afro Brazil ] airport art ] Nelson Atkins ] Zora Neale ] branly museum ] Longyear museum ] Douglas society Denver ] Denver art museum ] Centre Black African Civilization ] charles wright ] Seattle Art Museum ] Samuel Dorsky ] High museum Atlanta ]

A fine Eastern Pende Panya-Gombe African mask. Coll.: David Norden

African Art books I like | Genuine African Masks

‘The African Art Experience' at Belger Arts Center for Creative Studies

 UMKC • Kansas City, MO 64110 • (816)235-1000

University of Missouri Kansas  

The Belger Arts Center's “African Art Experience,” curated by UMKC professor of global arts Maude Southwell Wahlman, gave Kansas City viewers a chance for a close encounter with African art. Most of the sculptures, costumes, masks and dyed fabrics, which dated from the 1800s to 1970s, were displayed in the open, on view from a full 360 degrees.

Google  

According to postmodern theory, artworks like the ones in this show should be viewed in the context of the rituals for which they were created. The Belger Arts Center tried to bring African culture to the gallery, showing a video of ritual ceremonies, and inviting dancers, musicians, restaurants and merchants selling African wares to the openings. (found at  Kansascity.com)

UMKC- Belger Arts Center, African art experience

By VALERIE ZELL  The Star at Kansascity.com

Featuring more than 100 masks, sculptures, textiles and other objects, “The African Art Experience” has a great deal to sort through, but the sheer visual power and symbolic character of these objects make it a worthwhile effort.

Maude Wahlman, the exhibit's curator and the Dorothy and Dale Thompson/Missouri endowed professor of global arts at UMKC, said the objects represent a cultural style of art and cultural values.

 

“Africans value children, ancestral power or energy, the wisdom of the elders, education, rituals, ceremonies and prosperity for all,” she said. “Secret societies educate people of all ages, gradually over a lifetime, with rituals in which additional information about symbols and cultural traditions is taught to those who guard and respect it.”

Wahlman arranged the objects by country so visitors can follow geographically from Guinea Bissau in the far west, the show's starting point, east to Nigeria, and then south to the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola. While very effective in its presentation of cultural styles and art forms, the exhibit might have benefited from some editing.

Ancestral power, an overarching theme of African art, is based on the idea that one's deceased ancestors may be called upon for good luck and protection. A wood granary shutter containing a wooden lock from the Dogon culture in Mali typifies this belief. Its numerous images of ancestors carved in relief remind that the granary was protected by ancestral power.

Elephant Mask . Bamileke Culture, Cameroon Gelbard Collection

The exhibit is presented by the University of Missouri-Kansas City art and art history department and the Belger Arts Center for Creative Studies. It contains material from Wahlman's own collection and that of Kansas City-based Raymond Lake, as well as works from the New York collection of David Gelbard, the largest component of the show.

A Korhogo cloth, which Wahlman purchased in 1973, originates from Ivory Coast. The cloth presents images of Senufo masked dancers, snakes, birds and antelopes, among other creatures painted with a dark brown dye that “bonds” with the cloth. Functioning as both a commercial and a decorative object, cloths such as this one were made to sell to Africans, Europeans and the tourist trade.

Horse-tail flywhisks, produced by the Ashanti culture in Ghana, function as symbols of power and authority. The flywhisks, sporting handles covered in gold, are part of an ensemble associated with chiefs and other dignitaries, although they are primarily carried and used by their attendants.


Made to honor the ancestors, a Nigerian Egungun costume is worn over the head and shoulders and used in a dance by young men who see through its mesh frontispiece. According to Wahlman, the cowrie shells sewn into the costume indicate that it was made to honor someone from a Yoruba royal family; cowrie shells were once a form of currency and are still considered a symbol of wealth.

An elaborately beaded elephant mask from Cameroon references the animal as a symbol of power. Typical of those found in secret societies within the Bamileke kingdoms, it is worn with animal pelts by Elephant Society dancers that appear in a somber procession while carrying spears and horsetails.

A wooden charm, or oath taking figure called nkisi nkondi, originates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Shaped like a two-headed dog, the charm contains multiple nails inserted one by one, used to seal the oath and activate the charm by making it angry enough to work.

It's important to remember that objects like these, when placed in a gallery or museum setting, are removed from the ceremonial and ritualistic context. While the number of objects gathered here is perhaps too much to take in in a single visit, the exhibit deserves kudos for its effective presentation of cultural styles and the staggering variety of art forms it encompasses.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE SHOW 

“The African Art Experience” continues at the Belger Arts Center for Creative Studies, 2100 Walnut St., Missouri Kansas, through May 7. 

Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday; on First Fridays from 6 to 9:30; and by appointment. Docents available. Call (816) 474-3250 for information or to schedule tours of the exhibit.

global arts Maude Southwell Wahlman

 

buy african masks
African masks from Known Collections

African Antiques Newsletter

Build Your Dream Collection !

I never thought I would receive so much information's about the African art world !
Free Newletter.
Subscribe today : 

Free African Art Authenticity Report
 

 

african art on facebookDear African Art Collectors,

Discover the African Art books I like or join me on facebook

African Antiques is the archive and not growing much anymore but still updated.

Visit African Art to join our free newsletter and read recent African Art News.

For the last news about  UMKC-Belger Arts you should join our African Art Club and become an insider of the African art market.

And if you are a collector of African Art, have a look at our exclusive African Art Collection for sale.

David Norden


Mail David Norden
Sint-katelijnevest 27
ANTWERPEN-Belgium

Any questions?
Call us at +
32 3 227 35 40

african art | home | african art shop

In this section:
Start
Omhoog
Virtual Museum
African-Americans SF
Chicago-ceramics
Newark Museum
Cleveland arms
de Young-SF
Museum of fine arts Boston
Brooklyn Museum
New Orleans Museum
Detroit Institute DIA
SAMA Artistry
Museum for African Art
Barbier-Mueller
Cleveland
Dallas-Museum-of-Arts
Indianapolis
Columbia-Urhobo
NMAA Art-Treasures
Baltimore-museum
Dapper postcolonial
Fine-arts-Houston
Menil-Houston-Texas
Louvres-Islamic art
Minneapolis
Metropolitan
Israel Museum Jerusalem
Orlando-Museum
Cincinnati art museum
Philadelphia-Museum
Polk-Museum-of-Art
african culture Portland
Smithsonian-Washington
SMA fathers New Jersey
Tervueren
UMKC-Belger Arts
Whitman-New-Jersey
West-Valley-Arizona
Kunstkamera-Petersburg
Ethnology-Vienna
Irma-Stern-Museum
Appleton museum Ocala
UCLA-Fowler
Benin Museum
Weltkulture
DuSable Museum
Cuba museum
fineartshouston
Bowers museum
Museu Afro Brazil
airport art
Nelson Atkins
Zora Neale
branly museum
Longyear museum
Douglas society Denver
Denver art museum
Centre Black African Civilization
charles wright
Seattle Art Museum
Samuel Dorsky
High museum Atlanta 

African art books

The Tribal Arts of Africa

The Tribal Arts of Africa
Author: Jean-Baptiste Bacquart

more African Art books I like


read also : Start ] Virtual Museum ] African-Americans SF ] Chicago-ceramics ] Newark Museum ] Cleveland arms ] de Young-SF ] Museum of fine arts Boston ] Brooklyn Museum ] New Orleans Museum ] Detroit Institute DIA ] SAMA Artistry ] Museum for African Art ] Barbier-Mueller ] Cleveland ] Dallas-Museum-of-Arts ] Indianapolis ] Columbia-Urhobo ] NMAA Art-Treasures ] Baltimore-museum ] Dapper postcolonial ] Fine-arts-Houston ] Menil-Houston-Texas ] Louvres-Islamic art ] Minneapolis ] Metropolitan ] Israel Museum Jerusalem ] Orlando-Museum ] Cincinnati art museum ] Philadelphia-Museum ] Polk-Museum-of-Art ] african culture Portland ] Smithsonian-Washington ] SMA fathers New Jersey ] Tervueren ] [ UMKC-Belger Arts ] Whitman-New-Jersey ] West-Valley-Arizona ] Kunstkamera-Petersburg ] Ethnology-Vienna ] Irma-Stern-Museum ] Appleton museum Ocala ] UCLA-Fowler ] Benin Museum ] Weltkulture ] DuSable Museum ] Cuba museum ] fineartshouston ] Bowers museum ] Museu Afro Brazil ] airport art ] Nelson Atkins ] Zora Neale ] branly museum ] Longyear museum ] Douglas society Denver ] Denver art museum ] Centre Black African Civilization ] charles wright ] Seattle Art Museum ] Samuel Dorsky ] High museum Atlanta ]

Buy David Norden's African Antiques | AA group English | AA Français | Privacy & Earning disclaimer | Become our partner |  The African Antiques newsletter | African Art Club | facebook african art

 mail David Norden phone +32 3 227.35.40