african maskszimbabwe stone art
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A fine Eastern Pende Panya-Gombe African mask. Coll.: David Norden

African Art books I like | Genuine African Masks

Zimbabwe Stone Art

Thinker  SN3118
Edward Chiwawa
22.5 inch
$1,300

house of stone

Chabot-Las Positas Community College District 
5020 Franklin Drive, Pleasanton, CA 94588 Hayward, CA
Tel.: 925-485-5215 

The first modern Zimbabwean sculptors gained international recognition over 30 years ago. Their art today can be seen in the world’s major galleries and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Rodin Museum in Paris. Through apprenticeships in their workshops their craft has now been handed down to a new generation.

Zimbabwe stone art Today’s economic and political realities in Zimbabwe make it nearly impossible for a young artist to succeed. Their currency has practically collapsed, tourism has ceased, free expression has become dangerous, and international exposure nonexistent.

Through contacts within the surviving art world and travels to Zimbabwe, House of Stone plans to continue to bring exciting new Zimbabwean sculpture to the United States. Through your support, the work of these artists becomes valued and they and their art will thus hopefully survive the present harsh times.

To view the remaining statues from our most recent exhibit and other statues that House of Stone has sold, and for information on how to purchase a statue, please visit our GALLERY.

To learn more about modern Zimbabwean art

Zimbabwe Stone Art Sculpture sales benefit African kids with AIDS

By Kristofer Noceda, Article Last Updated:11/13/2006   found at insidebayarea.com 

zimbabwean stone art exhibitionDIANE ZULIANI, an art history instructor and gallery director, looks over the Zimbabwean sculpture show at Chabot College. The exhibit runs until Dec. 14, 2006; all proceeds benefit AIDS orphans in Zimbabwe. (Jane Tyska - Staff) DURING a trip to Zimbabwe in 1999, Dr. Arnd Herz and his wife, Dr. Susanne Martin, came across sculptures that would change not only their lives but also the lives of those in need.

The couple couldn't pass up the statues, and what was originally intended to be a few that they would purchase ended up becoming a full shipment.

"In order for us to bring the ones we wanted back home, we had to fill up a crate full of them," Herz said. "The question then was, 'What are we going to do with all these statues? If we sell them and make a profit, where would the money go to?'"

With AIDS being a major problem in Africa, the couple decided to help fund a local orphanage for children suffering from the disease.

"It's just amazing to see that a few thousand dollars can make a huge impact," Herz said.

Now the couple, through their nonprofit House of Stone Charitable Organization, has raised more than $100,000 to benefit AIDS orphans in Africa by selling Zimbabwean sculptures.

Their annual exhibit has found its way into the Chabot College Art Gallery, where 47 statues will be featured and available for purchase until Dec. 14, with all proceeds going toward AIDS orphans. The gallery is waiving all fees.

"This is the first time I've done this, but I'd (prefer that) the money goes toward helping someone in need rather than benefiting the gallery," said Diane Zuliani, gallery director.

For Herz, the experience in Zimbabwe makes the efforts worthwhile.

"Once you've been there and worked with the people — who are extremely friendly and open — and experience that first-hand, then you just become drawn into it," Herz said. "The nice thing for us is that it becomes a win-win situation. We don't have to beg people for money, and they get a piece of art in return for supporting a good cause."

Herz said he is particularly proud of a preschool project he helped create.

"One thing is that we aren't the experts on what the people need, so we let the Zimbabwe people let us know what they need," Herz said.

He was surprised by the request for a preschool, which became a learning experience.

"I found out there are many child-headed households, and if a preschool was built, it would give the younger siblings some adult supervision while the older kids can continue going to school," Herz said.

The program has grown to include Herz's parents in Germany, who have used the sculptures as a platform to raise $80,000 annually for the same cause.

"We're unsure of how long we'll continue the exhibits and fundraisers, but I do know we become energized by hearing the impact of what the proceeds have done in Zimbabwe," Herz said. "When people bring these statues home they have a piece of Africa. A symbol they can talk about to inspire others to get involved. I think that's how the program continues to live on."

For more information, call Diane Zuliani at (510) 723-6838 or visit http://www.houseofstone.org.

Kristofer Noceda covers education in Hayward, Castro Valley, San Leandro and San Lorenzo.

He can be reached at (510) 293-2479 

zimbabwe stoneHope in the face of AIDS SN3140
Bright Mukedwa
26.5 inch
900$

House of Stone - Artists of Tengenenge: Modern Zimbabwean Stone Sculptors

Chabot College Art Gallery to Exhibit and Sell Zimbabwean Sculptures to Benefit AIDS Orphans in Africa

(Hayward, CA 11/3/06 ) - The stone statues shimmer like polished river rock, from delicate birds to hearty elephants to abstract figures. But the artwork in this new exhibit, which opens at the Chabot College Art Gallery with a reception on Thursday, November 9, from 6-8 p.m., are much more than simple statues-they are breathtaking examples of how art can truly save lives.

The show, “House of Stone - Artists of Tengenenge: Modern Zimbabwean Stone Sculptors", displays nearly 50 statues carved by some of the 900 artists of the Zimbabwean sculptors’ colony, Tengenenge. Presented in collaboration with the House of Stone Charitable Organization based in Oakland, the show is designed to raise awareness of the AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe. All proceeds from sales go directly to projects which help the more than one million Zimbabwean children orphaned by AIDS.
The House of Stone Charitable Organization was co-founded in 2001 by Dr. Arnd Herz, Chief of Pediatrics at Kaiser Permanente in Hayward, and his wife, Dr. Susanne Martin Herz, also a pediatrician, who discovered the sculptors while on a visit to Africa. They have since returned to Zimbabwe several times, working with the children, buying sculpture, and sponsoring schools, orphanages, and similar programs with House of Stone funds.

A sampling of the works have been shown around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Rodin Museum in Paris, and now Diane Zuliani, Chabot art instructor and gallery director, is thrilled to have them displayed at the college.
“If anyone wants to know what real contemporary art in Africa looks like, this is it,” says Zuliani, whose Museum Studies students curated the exhibit. “It is made outdoors by barefoot carvers in torn t-shirts, but it shows all the features of sophisticated modernism. Picasso’s legacy is alive and thriving in these remarkable pieces.”

“By working collectively,” Zuliani adds, “these artists have been able to heighten the world’s awareness of this traditional form of Zimbabwean self-expression and Zimbabwe itself, which suffers from staggeringly high rates of HIV-AIDS among the adult population as well as debilitating rates of poverty”. “Nevertheless”, she says, “Zimbabweans place a high value on culture and education and have the highest literacy rates in Africa”.

“The most inspiring aspect of the artwork to me,” says Zuliani, “is that in the face of terrible adversity, these artists are committed to expressing what is beautiful and joyful. In the face of death, they are resolutely celebrating life.”

The exhibit will be shown through December 14 during the following gallery hours: Mondays, 12 p.m.-2 p.m.; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12 p.m.-2 p.m. and 6-7 p.m.; and Wednesdays, 12 p.m.-1 p.m. and 6 p.m.-7 p.m. For more information, call Diane Zuliani at (510) 723- 6838 or Rebecca Verity at House of Stone Charitable Organization at (510) 530-1669 or go to www.houseofstone.org 

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In this section:
Start
Omhoog
Modern tribal art
African-textiles
Contemporary art
Monaco-Arts-Africa
African-vibes
Africa screams
Africa-remix
Documenta Madrid
African-words
Shona stone family sculpture
hairstyles - Blaffer gallery
Twins-Seven-Seven
Jean Pigozzi
Miami art museum-Mutu
River Crossing
Fiber-Art
airbrush art gallery
contemporary art
Seydou Keyta
Zanzibar artists
modern african art
museum of modern art
Cape Africa
art fairs list
Ifa Lethu
guggenheim bilbao
zimbabwe stone art
South African paintings
code coverage tool c
African American food
expanding Africa
primitivism revisited
Chapunga sculpture park
fire in the heart
tribal tattoos
south africa gallery
african encounters
architecture of the veil
blood art
Shona stone sculptures
Contemporary African Diasporan Arts
south african art
Contemporary art from Africa
jose vermeersch
Is It Art
Ebay African Art 

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read also : Start ] Modern tribal art ] African-textiles ] Contemporary art ] Monaco-Arts-Africa ] African-vibes ] Africa screams ] Africa-remix ] Documenta Madrid ] African-words ] Shona stone family sculpture ] hairstyles - Blaffer gallery ] Twins-Seven-Seven ] Jean Pigozzi ] Miami art museum-Mutu ] River Crossing ] Fiber-Art ] airbrush art gallery ] contemporary art ] Seydou Keyta ] Zanzibar artists ] modern african art ] museum of modern art ] Cape Africa ] art fairs list ] Ifa Lethu ] guggenheim bilbao ] [ zimbabwe stone art ] South African paintings ] code coverage tool c ] African American food ] expanding Africa ] primitivism revisited ] Chapunga sculpture park ] fire in the heart ] tribal tattoos ] south africa gallery ] african encounters ] architecture of the veil ] blood art ] Shona stone sculptures ] Contemporary African Diasporan Arts ] south african art ] Contemporary art from Africa ] jose vermeersch ] Is It Art ] Ebay African Art ]

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