Aphra Behn
The Dream


The Willing Mistress


On her Loving Two equally


To the Fair Clarinda



The Dream
All trembling in my arms Aminta lay, Defending of the bliss I strove to take; Raising my rapture by her kind delay, Her force so charming was and weak. The soft resistance did betray the grant, While I pressed on the heaven of my desires; Her rising breasts with nimbler motions pant; Her dying eyes assume new fires. Now to the height of languishment she grows, And still her looks new charms put on; – Now the last mystery of Love she knows, We sigh, and kiss: I waked, and all was done. `Twas but a dream, yet by my heart I knew, Which still was panting, part of it was true: Oh how I strove the rest to have believed; Ashamed and angry to be undeceived!




Linecol

The Willing Mistress
Amyntas led me to a Grove, Where all the Trees did shade us; The Sun it self, though it had Strove, It could not have betray'd us: The place secur'd from humane Eyes, No other fear allows, But when the Winds that gently rise, Doe Kiss the yielding Boughs. Down there we satt upon the Moss, And did begin to play A Thousand Amorous Tricks, to pass The heat of all the day. A many Kisses he did give: And I return'd the same Which made me willing to receive That which I dare not name. His Charming Eyes no Aid requir'd To tell their softning Tale; On her that was already fir'd, 'Twas Easy to prevaile. He did but Kiss and Clasp me round, Whilst those his thoughts Exprest: And lay'd me gently on the Ground: Ah who can guess the rest?




Linecol

On her Loving Two equally
                    I.
How strongly does my passion flow, Divided equally 'twixt two? Damon had ne'er subdued my heart, Had not Alexis took his part; Nor could Alexis powerful prove, Without my Damon's aid, to gain my love.                     II.
When my Alexis present is, Then I for Damon sigh and mourn; But when Alexis I do miss, Damon gains nothing but my scorn. But if it chance they both are by, For both alike I languish, sigh, and die.                     III.
Cure then, thou mighty winged god, This restless fever in my blood; One golden-pointed dart take back: But which, O Cupid, wilt thou take? If Damon's, all my hopes are crossed; Or that of my Alexis, I am lost.




Linecol

To the Fair Clarinda
Fair lovely Maid, or if that Title be Too weak, too Feminine for Nobler thee, Permit a Name that more Approaches Truth: And let me call thee, Lovely Charming Youth. This last will justifie my soft complaint, While that may serve to lessen my constraint; And without Blushes I the Youth persue, When so much beauteous Woman is in view. Against thy Charms we struggle but in vain With thy deluding Form thou giv'st us pain, While the bright Nymph betrays us to the Swain. In pity to our Sex sure thou wer't sent, That we might Love, and yet be Innocent: For sure no Crime with thee we can commit; Or if we shou'd - thy Form excuses it. For who, that gathers fairest Flowers believes A Snake lies hid beneath the Fragrant Leaves. Though beauteous Wonder of a different kind, Soft Cloris with the dear Alexis join'd; When e'er the Manly part of thee, wou'd plead Though tempts us with the Image of the Maid, While we the noblest Passions do extend The Love to Hermes, Aphrodite the Friend.


Aphra Behn
 (1640-1689)

Linecol



Charlotte Brontė - Passion


Emily Brontė - Poems


Anne Brontė - Last lines


Dead Poetesses Society


Dead Poets Society



Homepage


Pageviews since/sinds 21-03-2002: 

© Gaston D'Haese: 16-11-2012.
Update: 14-03-2016.