Mary Frye

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Als je aan mijn graf staat heb geen nood

Aan mijn graf heb geen verdriet

Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet

Do not stand at my grave and weep*


Do not stand at my grave and weep, 
I am not there, I do not sleep. 
I am in a thousand winds that blow, 
I am the softly falling snow. 
I am the gentle showers of rain, 
I am the fields of ripening grain. 
I am in the morning hush, 
I am in the graceful rush 
Of beautiful birds in circling flight, 
I am the starshine of the night. 
I am in the flowers that bloom, 
I am in a quiet room. 
I am in the birds that sing, 
I am in each lovely thing. 
Do not stand at my grave and cry, 
I am not there. I do not die.

*1932


Do not stand at my grave and weep**


Do not stand at my grave and weep,
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning’s hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circling flight.
I am the soft starlight at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.


**The "definitive version", as published by The Times and The Sunday
Times in Frye's obituary, 5 November 2004.
Source: Wikipedia.

"Mary Frye, who was living in Baltimore at the time, wrote the poem
in 1932. She had never written any poetry, but the plight of a young
German Jewish woman, Margaret Schwarzkopf, who was staying with
her and her husband, inspired the poem. Margaret Schwarzkopf had been
concerned about her mother, who was ill in Germany, but she had been
warned not to return home because of increasing anti-Semitic unrest.
When her mother died, the heartbroken young woman told Frye that she
never had the chance to “stand by my mother’s grave and shed a tear”.
Frye found herself composing a piece of verse on a brown paper shopping
bag. Later she said that the words “just came to her” and expressed what
she felt about life and death.
Mary Frye circulated the poem privately, never publishing or copyrighting
it. She wrote other poems, but this, her first, endured.
Her obituary in The Times made it clear that she was the author of the
famous poem, which has been recited at funerals and on other appropriate
occasions around the world for 80 years.
The poem was introduced to many in Britain when it was read by the father
of a soldier killed by a bomb in Northern Ireland. The soldier's father read
the poem on BBC radio in 1995 in remembrance of his son, who had left
the poem among his personal effects in an envelope addressed 'To all my
loved ones'.
The authorship of the poem was established a few years later after
an investigation by journalist Abigail Van Buren. It has become a very
popular poem and a common reading for funerals."
© Source: Wikipedia.



Als je aan mijn graf staat heb geen nood

Als je aan mijn graf staat heb geen nood. 
Ik ben daar niet. Ik ben niet dood.  
Ik ben in wel duizend winden,
Ik ben in vlokjes sneeuw te vinden. 
Ik ben de malse regenvlagen, 
Ik ben de velden op zomerdagen. 
Ik ben in de frisse morgenlucht, 
Ik ben in de sierlijke vlucht,  
van cirkelende vogels in al hun pracht, 
Ik ben de sterrenschijn in de nacht. 
Ik ben in mooie bloemenpraal, 
Ik ben in een serene zaal. 
Ik ben in de vogels die zingen, 
Ik ben in alle lieve dingen. 
Als je aan mijn graf staat heb geen nood 
Ik ben daar niet. Ik ga niet dood.


Aan mijn graf heb geen verdriet

Aan mijn graf heb geen verdriet,
Ik slaap niet en ik ben daar niet.
Ik ben het zonlicht op het riet,
Ik ben in wel duizend winden,
Ik ben in de sneeuw te vinden. 
Ik ben regen die op ruiten slaat
Als je stil ontwaakt bij dageraad.
Ik ben de vogels in de lucht
Met hun sierlijke cirkelvlucht.
Ik ben sterrengeflonker dat je ziet.
Aan mijn graf heb geen verdriet,
Ik ben niet dood; ik ben daar niet.


Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen nood *

Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen nood. 
Ik ben hier niet. Ik ben niet dood.  
Ik ben in wel duizend winden,
Ik ben in vlokjes sneeuw te vinden. 
Ik ben de malse regenvlagen, 
Ik ben de velden op zomerdagen. 
Ik ben in de frisse morgenlucht, 
Ik ben in de sierlijke vlucht,  
van cirkelende vogels in al hun pracht, 
Ik ben de sterrenschijn in de nacht. 
Ik ben in mooie bloemenpraal, 
Ik ben in een serene zaal. 
Ik ben in de vogels die zingen, 
Ik ben in alle lieve dingen. 
Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen nood. 
Ik ben hier niet. Ik ga niet dood.


Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet **

Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet;
Mijn lijf werd stof maar ik ben hier niet.
Ik ben het zonlicht op het riet,
Ik ben in wel duizend winden,
Ik ben in vlokjes sneeuw te vinden. 
Ik ben regen die op ruiten slaat
Als je stil ontwaakt bij dageraad.
Ik ben de vogels in de lucht
Met hun sierlijke cirkelvlucht.
Ik ben sterrengeflonker dat je ziet.
Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet,
Ik ben niet dood; ik ben hier niet.


Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet ***

Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet;
Mijn lijf werd stof maar ik ben hier niet.
Ik ben in wel duizend winden,
Ik ben in vlokjes sneeuw te vinden. 
Ik ben de malse regenvlagen, 
Ik ben de velden op zomerdagen. 
Ik ben in de frisse morgenlucht, 
Ik ben in de sierlijke vlucht,  
van cirkelende vogels in al hun pracht, 
Ik ben de sterrenschijn in de nacht. 
Ik ben in mooie bloemenpraal, 
Ik ben in een serene zaal. 
Ik ben in de vogels die zingen, 
Ik ben in alle lieve dingen.
Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet,
Mijn lijf werd stof maar ik ben hier niet.


© Hertalingen van Gaston D'Haese (pseud. Lepus).
© 'Als je mijn as uitstrooit heb geen verdriet'
(bij crematie - 3 versies van Lepus)

Upward - Naar boven

Emily Dickinson
Anthology


Emily Dickinson
Love poems


Emily Dickinson
YOUR riches taught me poverty


Emily Dickinson
In het Nederlands


Dead Poetesses Society


Homepage


Pageviews since/sinds 21-03-2002: 

© Gaston D'Haese: 20-09-2009.
Update: 18-09-2017.

E-mail:   webmaster