Spinoza’s Ethica
A systematical presentation of the emotions (affectus)

caute seal

by Rudolf W. Meijer

Table of contents

Introduction
1. The various definitions of the individual emotions
1.1. The number of (different) definitions present for each emotion
1.2. Completeness of the set of definitions
1.3. The naming of the emotions
1.4. Consistency between the definitions given
2. Towards a taxonomy of emotions
2.1. Spinoza’s own statements of intention, and use of terms
2.2. Basic notions
2.3. Other categorisations
2.4. A first attempt at taxonomy
3. The relationships between emotions
3.1. Instances of actio having their counterpart in a passio
3.2. Correspondences among instances of each of the primitive emotions
3.3. Corresponding emotions with internal and external causes
3.4. Opposite emotions
3.5. Contrary emotions
4. Overview table of emotions
Tables of definitions
Index of terms

Introduction

The idea for this essay arose from the work I did on the Glossarium to Spinoza’s works, in which I thought it useful, if only for my own better understanding, to give a systematical index to the emotions (as – following Elwes – we will call the affectus for want of a better term) and related terms as defined in the Ethica. Inspired by the work of Terry Neff, I conceived this index as a table, in which the relative positions of the names of the emotions reflect as much as possible their conceptual relationships.

My point of departure was the list of 48 definitions annexed to Part III of the Ethica (known as Affectuum Definitiones), which the author qualifies as “an orderly repetition of the ones given elsewhere in Part III, together with some observations” (see at the end of P. 3. prop 59. schol.). Indeed, the Ethica contains at least two definitions of each of those emotions: one (or more!) in the text proper (usually in a Scholium of Part III), and one in the summary list just mentioned. In addition, one can find other terms, denoting concepts similar or related to the listed emotions that, for one reason or another, are not comprised in the summary list, or only mentioned in explanations. Even though some of them are explicitly identified by Spinoza as being of a different category: ad corpus tantum refertur, passio non est, affectus non est etc., there is an interest to have all of these terms collected and presented systematically, after analysis and resolution of the possible inconsistencies.

The initial assignment I gave myself, therefore, was to make the overall list as consistent and complete as possible, while basing myself exclusively on Spinoza’s text, i. e. avoiding reference to anything outside it. The results are to be found in section 1 below. My first attempts to create a taxonomy of emotions are documented in section 2. A third section exhibits the relationships existing between the various emotions. Finally, section 4 shows the overview table.

1. The various definitions of the individual emotions

1.1. The number of (different) definitions present for each emotion

As can be seen from Table 1, most of the 48 emotions for which a precise definition is given in the Affectuum Definitiones at the end of Part III have a single “corresponding” definition in the text of the Ethica proper. In three cases (Acquiescentia in se ipso, Ambitio and Humanitas seu Modestia), there are three separate and different definitions or specifications. In three more cases (Commiseratio, Consternatio, and Poenitentia), there are two different definitions given in the text. There is only one emotion which does not really have any corresponding definition elsewhere: Misericordia – the additional wording found in the explanation to the definition of Commiseratio is in fact contributing to inconsistency.

With only a few exceptions, these corresponding definitions occur in Part III. The one for Abiectio is in Part IV, and one of those for Ambitio is in Part V, both of these are thus occuring after the summary list.

Remarkably, the occurrence of (multiple) alternative definitions is not correlated with the inconsistencies noted below for some of the individual emotions.

1.2. Completeness of the set of definitions

The text of the Ethics contains a number of definitions of notions that do not recur in the Affectuum Definitiones, at least not in the form of a numbered definition. Table 2 below lists these notions and the corresponding formulations, which also exhibit the phenomenon of double specification in a number of cases: Verecundia, Veneratio, Dedignatio, Temperantia, Sobrietas and Clementia.

From this table (which in itself may not be complete!) one sees that there are several named emotions which should probably have found their place in the Affectuum Definitiones: this concerns first of all the pair Laus/Vituperium, and the series Hilaritas/Melancholia/Titillatio/Dolor, all of which are instances of Laetitia/Tristitia, then Verecundia, which is an instance of Timor, and Zelotypia, which is incidentally the only instance of animi fluctuatio mentioned explicitly. The set Veneratio/Horror/Dedignatio is defined as instances or consequences of Admiratio/Contemptus, although not entirely consistently, as noted below. Furthermore, there are two unnamed emotions, namely the nameless instance of Laetitia corresponding to Commiseratio and Aemulatio, and the other nameless instance of Laetitia related to Desiderium. The names suggested in Table 2 for these unnamed emotions are purely conventional and serve as reference to the definitions only. Then there are those emotions qualified as not being passiones, or governed by ratio, namely Animositas, Generositas, Temperantia, Sobrietas, Castitas, Animi in periculis praesentia, Honestas, Clementia, Pietas and Modestia. These will be given their appropriate place in the taxonomy. Finally there is a named notion which Spinoza explicitly qualifies as not being an emotion, namely Impudentia. The explanation/proof promised for this statement (suo loco ostendam) is incidentally not to be found in the Ethica. Three further notions should be mentioned here that are, at least from the meaning of the terms, opposites of ones defined under the heading of emotions, like Impudentia with respect to Verecundia: Ingratitudo (cf. Gratia seu Gratitudo), Inhumanitas (cf. Humanitas) and Turpitudo (cf. Honestas). In P. 4. prop. 71. schol., Ingratitudo is said not to be an emotion (it characterises behaviour that can be caused by actio, passio, or the absence of either), while Inhumanitas is said of someone who is neither moved by ratio nor passio (see P. 4. prop. 50. schol.). Likewise Turpitudo is qualified as characterising behaviour rather than identifying an emotion (see P. 4. prop. 37. schol. 1.). For these reasons, none of these “negative” notions is included in the systematical presentation.

1.3. The naming of the emotions

The basis of any comparison of definitions is the identification by name of the defined concept. Here it can be remarked that Spinoza gives more than one name to the listed emotions in several cases:

In contrast, the “quartet” of emotions defined in P. 3. prop. 23. and 24. is subsumed under a single name: Invidia, even though four names could have been used to distinguish them. See also the remarks below (2.1.) on Spinoza’s use of terms.

1.4. Consistency between the definitions given

Analysing the two or more definitions in each case, one finds the following:

For the purposes of our exercise it is only the inconsistencies that should worry us, since they may make it more difficult to correctly interpret the relationships between the emotions. Concretely, the following resolutions of these inconsistencies are proposed:

2. Towards a taxonomy of emotions

2.1. Spinoza’s own statements of intention, and use of terms

In the preface to Part III, Spinoza indicates his intention to deal with the subject of emotions as dispassionately as possible (the word is quite appropriate!), his final purpose being to determine the mind’s power to restrain and moderate these emotions. He therefore accepts that he cannot attain completeness, since there are as many shades of emotion as there are objects.

Affectus itaque odii, irae, invidiae etc. in se considerati ex eadem naturae necessitate et virtute consequuntur, ac reliqua singularia; ac proinde certas causas agnoscunt, per quas intelliguntur, certasque proprietates habent, cognitione nostra aeque dignas ac proprietates cuiuscumque alterius rei cuius sola contemplatione delectamur [ ... ] et humanas actiones atque appetitus considerabo perinde, ac si quaestio de lineis, planis aut de corporibus esset. (P. 3. praef.)

Caeterum reliquas affectuum species hic explicare nec possum (quia tot sunt quot obiectorum species), nec, si possem, necesse est. Nam ad id quod intendimus, nempe ad affectuum vires et mentis in eosdem potentiam determinandum, nobis sufficit, uniuscuiusque affectus generalem habere definitionem. Sufficit, inquam, nobis affectuum et mentis communes proprietates intelligere, ut determinare possimus, qualis et quanta sit mentis potentia in moderandis et coercendis affectibus. Quamvis itaque magna sit differentia inter hunc et illum amoris, odii vel cupiditatis affectum, ex. gr. inter amorem erga liberos et amorem erga uxorem, nobis tamen has differentias cognoscere et affectuum naturam et originem ulterius indagare non est opus. (P. 3. prop. 56. schol.)

As far as choosing names for the emotions is concerned, he is sometimes inclined to follow accepted usage, or the etymology of certain terms (see e. g. the explanation to Desiderium). On the other hand, as he indicates in several places, for the purpose of a more systematic treatment he has to deviate from accepted usage, since common naming conventions do not respect scientific criteria (see the explanation to Favor/Indignatio, P. 3. prop. 52. schol. and prop. 56. schol.). Also, apparently he did not find acceptable names for some of the emotions that his (admittedly incomplete) analysis indicates should exist, as was seen in 1.2. for two unnamed instances of Laetitia.

Quare desiderium revera tristitia est, quae laetitiae opponitur illi, quae ex absentia rei, quam odimus, oritur [ ... ]. Sed quia nomen desiderium cupiditatem respicere videtur, ideo hunc affectum ad cupiditatis affectus refero. (P. 3. aff. defin. 32. explic.)

Haec nomina ex communi usu aliud significare scio. Sed meum institutum non est, verborum significationem, sed rerum naturam explicare, easque iis vocabulis indicare, quorum significatio, quam ex usu habent, a significatione, qua eadem usurpare volo, non omnino abhorret, quod semel monuisse sufficiat. (P. 3. aff. defin. 20. explic.)

[ ... ] atque adeo plures affectus deducere poterimus, quam qui receptis vocabulis indicari solent. Unde apparet, affectuum nomina inventa esse magis ex eorum vulgari usu, quam ex eorundem accurata cognitione. (P. 3. prop. 52. schol.)

[ ... ] affectuum nomina (ut iam monui) magis eorum usum, quam naturam respiciunt (P. 3. aff. defin. 31. explic.)

[ ... ] hac de causa ego admirationem inter affectus non numero, nec causam video, cur id facerem [ ... ] nec alia de causa verba de admiratione feci, quam quia usu factum est ut quidam affectus, qui ex tribus primitivis derivantur, aliis nominibus indicari soleant quando ad obiecta, quae admiramur, referuntur (P. 3. aff. defin. 4. explic.)

Qui id quod odio habet, tristitia affectum imaginatur, laetabitur; si contra idem laetitia affectum esse imaginetur, contristabitur (P. 3. prop. 23.) Si aliquem imaginamur laetitia afficere rem, quam odio habemus, odio etiam erga eum afficiemur. Si contra eundem imaginamur tristitia eandem rem afficere, amore erga ipsum afficiemur (P. 3. prop. 24.) Hi et similes odii affectus ad invidiam referuntur (P. 3. prop. 24. schol.)

2.2. Basic notions

For a useful classification of the terms obtained, one must start from the general notion of emotion itself, which is defined by Spinoza in two places: in the third definition of Part III, and in the general definition which follows the summary list at the end of Part III.

Per affectum intelligo corporis affectiones, quibus ipsius corporis agendi potentia augetur vel minuitur, iuvatur vel coercetur, et simul harum affectionum ideas. EXPLICATIO. Si itaque alicuius harum affectionum adaequata possimus esse causa, tum per affectum actionem intelligo; alias passionem. (P. 3. defin. 3.)

Affectus, qui animi pathema dicitur, est confusa idea, qua mens maiorem vel minorem sui corporis vel alicuius eius partis existendi vim, quam antea, affirmat, et qua data ipsa mens ad hoc potius, quam ad illud cogitandum determinatur. (P. 3. aff. defin. gener.)

The first definition is more inclusive, since it encompasses affectiones of two kinds: the ones that we can be adequate cause of (actio), and the ones of which we cannot (passio). The Affectuum Generalis Definitio speaks about animi pathema, where pathema (Greek παθημα) must be identified with passio, i. e. it refers to the second kind of emotion only. Within the set of passiones Spinoza distinguishes three “primitive” emotions (in his terms: affectus primitivi seu primarii), namely Cupiditas, Laetitia and Tristitia. Many other emotions he mentions (also, as we saw earlier, outside the Affectuum Definitiones) are instances of these three. Conversely, there are two notions listed in the Affectuum Definitiones which do not clearly fit in this scheme: Admiratio/Contemptus, which are qualified as mentis affectio. In 2.1. we saw that Spinoza included these only because some other emotions are differently named when they are combined with admiration or contempt. These two should therefore not be considered as emotions in themselves.

Tres igitur (ut in schol. prop. 11. huius monui) tantum affectus primitivos seu primarios agnosco, nempe laetitiae, tristitiae et cupiditatis (P. 3. aff. defin. 4. explic.) praeter hos tres nullum alium agnosco affectum primarium; nam reliquos ex his tribus oriri in seqq. ostendam (P. 3. prop. 11. schol.)

In P. 3. prop. 59. schol., the notion [ animi ] fortitudo is introduced for actiones, quae sequuntur ex affectibus, qui ad mentem referuntur, quatenus intelligit. Note, by the way that the addition animi is in fact not found there, but in P. 4. prop. 69. where the expression animi virtus seu fortitudo is used. According to the beneficiary (self or other) these emotions are distinguished in Animositas, Generositas and their respective instances. Most of these instances have an “analogon” among the passiones. But note that such an analogon can not be an instance of Tristitia. In fact, the only ones that can be surmised from the text are instances of Cupiditas.

Mentis actiones ex solis ideis adaequatis oriuntur (P. 3. prop. 3.)

Inter omnes affectus, qui ad mentem, quatenus agit, referuntur, nulli alii sunt, quam qui ad laetitiam vel cupiditatem referuntur (P. 3. prop. 59.)

Omnes actiones, quae sequuntur ex affectibus, qui ad mentem referuntur, quatenus intelligit, ad fortitudinem refero quam in animositatem et generositatem distinguo [ ... ] Eas itaque actiones, quae solum agentis utile intendunt, ad animositatem, et quae alterius etiam utile intendunt, ad generositatem refero (P. 3. prop. 59. schol.)

[ ... ] animi virtus seu fortitudo (huius defin. vide in schol. prop. 59. P. 3.) (P. 4. prop. 69. demonstr.)

2.3. Other categorisations

The instances of Laetitia and Tristitia are distinguished in those that are associated with external causes (which includes incidental causes) and those that have internal causes.

Atque hi affectus laetitiae et tristitiae sunt, quos idea rei externae comitatur tamquam causa per se vel per accidens. Hinc ad alios transeo, quos idea rei internae comitatur tamquam causa (P. 3. aff. defin. 24. explic.)

One other notion is mentioned in Part IV of the Ethica, that could be used to relate emotions to each other: that of affectus contrarii. The only example given is Luxuria vs. Avaritia. This relationship of “contrariness” should be distinguished from the “opposition” existing between Laetitia and Tristitia, on account of which many of their instances also occur in pairs. Also among the other notions there are such obvious pairs of opposites. In all these cases, the “pairing” is apparent from the symmetrical formulation of their definitions and, sometimes, by the explicit use of opponitur or opposita in one of the definitions.

Per contrarios affectus in seqq. intelligam eos, qui hominem diversum trahunt, quamvis eiusdem sint generis, ut luxuries et avaritia, quae amoris sunt species; nec natura, sed per accidens sunt contrarii (P. 4. defin. 5.)

The notions of affectus erga rem praeteritam, praesentem, futuram are not very useful for categorisation purposes.

Quid per affectum erga rem futuram, praesentem et praeteritam intelligam, explicui in schol. 1. et 2. prop. 18. P. 3. (P. 4 defin. 6.)

Rem eatenus praeteritam aut futuram hic voco, quatenus ab eadem affecti fuimus aut afficiemur. Ex. gr. quatenus ipsam vidimus aut videbimus, nos refecit aut reficiet, nos laesit aut laedet etc. Quatenus enim eandem sic imaginamur, eatenus eius existentiam affirmamus, hoc est, corpus nullo affectu afficitur, qui rei existentiam secludat; atque adeo (per prop. 17. P. 2.) corpus eiusdem rei imagine eodem modo afficitur, ac si res ipsa praesens adesset (P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 1.)

2.4. A first attempt at taxonomy

The following list gives a hierarchical structure to the collection of emotions identified previously, in accordance with Spinoza’s definitions of terms, and the proposed resolution of inconsistencies. This list does of course not permit any non-hierarchical correspondences to be shown. These will be treated in section 3.

passiones
appetitus cum eiusdem conscientia
Cupiditas
species cupiditatis
... re aliqua potiundi, quae eiusdem rei memoria fovetur Desiderium
affectuum imitatio Aemulatio
... benefaciendi ei, qui nos amat Gratia seu Gratitudo
... benefaciendi ei, cuius nos miseret Benevolentia
... malum inferendi ei, quem odimus Ira
... malum nobis illatum referendi Vindicta
... malum inferendi ei, quem amamus, vel cuius nos miseret Crudelitas seu Saevitia
... maius quod metuimus malum minore vitandi Timor
... aliquid agendi cum periculo, quod aequales subire metuunt Audacia
quae coercetur timore periculi, quod aequales subire audent Pusillanimitas
... ea faciendi quae hominibus placent Humanitas
idem quando impense vulgo placere conamur Ambitio
species timoris
... si malum, quod timet, pudor sit Verecundia
... si malum, quod timet, admiratur Consternatio
immoderata cupiditas et amor
... convivandi, ... potandi Luxuria/Ebrietas
... divitiarum Avaritia
... in commiscendis corporibus Libido
transitio ad maiorem/minorem perfectionem
Laetitia/Tristitia
concomitante idea causae internae
concomitante idea sui tamquam causa Acquiescentia in se ipso/Poenitentia
ex eo, quod homo suam potentiam/imbecillitatem contemplatur Acquiescentia in se ipso/Humilitas
ex eo, quod homo se laudari/vituperari credit Gloria/Pudor
ex eo, quod homo de se plus/minus iusto sentit Superbia/Abiectio
concomitante idea causae externae
generalis
Amor/Odium
... alicuius rei, quae per accidens causa est Propensio/Aversio
ex eo, quod homo de alio plus/minus iusto sentit Existimatio/Despectus
... qua alterius actionem delectamur/aversamur Laus/Vituperium
orta ex idea rei, de cuius eventu dubitamus Spes/Metus
orta ex idea rei, de qua dubitandi causa sublata est Securitas/Desperatio
orta ex idea rei praeteritae, quae praeter spem evenit Gaudium/Conscientiae morsus
... ut ex bono alterius gaudeat/contristetur etc. Misericordia/Invidia
orta ex destructione rei, quam odimus/
absentia rei, quam amamus
[ Desiderio oppositum ]/Desiderium
orta ex alterius bono/damno [ Laetitiae imitatio ]/Commiseratio
species amoris/odii
... erga aliquem, qui alteri benefecit/malefecit Favor/Indignatio
amor erga eum, quem admiramur Devotio
laetitia ex contemptu rei, quam odimus Irrisio
animi fluctuatio concomitante idea alterius, cui invidetur Zelotypia
ad corpus potissimum referuntur
omnes partes hominis pariter sunt affectae Hilaritas/Melancholia
una eius pars prae reliquis est affecta Titillatio/Dolor
mentis affectio sive rei singularis imaginatio ]
Admiratio/Contemptus
species admirationis/contemptus
admiratio prudentiae, industriae etc. Veneratio
admiratio irae, invidiae etc. Horror
contemptus stultitiae Dedignatio
actiones (animi fortitudo)
solum agentis utile intendunt
Animositas
species animositatis
opponitur luxuriae Temperantia
opponitur ebrietati Sobrietas
opponitur libidini Castitas
  Animi in periculis praesentia
alterius etiam utile intendunt
Generositas vid. etiam Honestas
species generositatis
cupiditas bene faciendi Pietas
cupiditas hominibus placendi Modestia
qua homo iram et vindictam moderatur Clementia

3. The relationships between emotions

3.1. Instances of actio having their counterpart in a passio

Note that the couterpart can be an analogon, or just the opposite (example: Clementia). The latter cases are marked by a *.

basis for relationship actio passio
cupiditas benefaciendi Pietas Gratia seu Gratitudo
Benevolentia
cupiditas hominibus placendi Modestia Humanitas,
Ambitio
* moderatur
* opponitur
Clementia Ira, Vindicta
Crudelitas seu Saevitia
* moderatur/opponitur Temperantia Luxuria
* moderatur/opponitur Sobrietas Ebrietas
* moderatur/opponitur Castitas Libido

3.2. Correspondences among instances of each of the primitive emotions

corresponding element Laetitia Tristitia Cupiditas
appetitus rei potiundi [ Desiderio oppositum ] Desiderium Desiderium
imitatio [ Laetitiae imitatio ] Commiseratio Aemulatio
alterius opinio Gloria Pudor Humanitas,
Ambitio

3.3. Corresponding emotions with internal and external causes

corresponding element internal cause external cause
casus generalis Acquiescentia in se ipso/Poenitentia Amor/Odium
opinio alterius/sui Gloria/Pudor Laus/Vituperium
plus/minus iusto sentire Superbia/Abiectio Existimatio/Despectus

3.4. Opposite emotions

The emotions are presented in the order in which they occur in the hierarchical list of 2.4. Note the double occurence of Acquiescentia in se ipso, corresponding to the fact that two of its aspects have different opposites in Spinoza’s scheme.

Audacia Pusillanimitas
Laetitia Tristitia
Acquiescentia in se ipso Poenitentia
Acquiescentia in se ipso Humilitas
Superbia Abiectio
Gloria Pudor
Amor Odium
Propensio Aversio
Existimatio Despectus
Laus Vituperium
Spes Metus
Securitas Desperatio
Gaudium Conscientiae morsus
Misericordia Invidia
[ Laetitiae imitatio ] Commiseratio
[ Desiderio oppositum ] Desiderium
Favor Indignatio
Admiratio Contemptus

3.5. Contrary emotions

Luxuria Avaritia

4. Overview table of emotions

The table that follows attempts to incorporate both the hierarchical classification obtained in section 2 and most of the relationships from section 3. In addition, it shows the quartet of “external signs of emotion” Tremor/Livor/Singultus/Risus, which have no precise definition, and are notable only because in P. 4. prop. 45. schol. 2. there is a comparison of Risus (of which it is said there, that it is an instance of Laetitia) and Irrisio.

With some formatting conversions and adapted hyperlinks, this table is re-appearing in the Glossarium.

affectus
passio
(animi
pathema)
actio
(animi
fortitudo)
affectus primitivus sive primarius Generositas
sive
Honestas


Animositas
Laetitia Tristitia Cupiditas
species laetitiae species tristitiae species cupiditatis
[ Desiderio oppositum ] Desiderium
causa
interna
causa
externa
causa
interna
causa
externa
 
Acquiescentia
in se ipso
Amor Poenitentia Odium
Humilitas
Superbia Existimatio Abiectio Despectus
  Propensio   Aversio
Misericordia Invidia
[ Laetitiae imitatio ] Commiseratio Aemulatio
Spes Metus Timor
Securitas Desperatio Audacia Pusillanimitas
Gaudium Conscientiae
morsus
  Verecundia
  Devotio
Irrisio
  Consternatio species
generositatis
Gloria Laus Pudor Vituperium Humanitas
Ambitio
Modestia
  Favor   Indignatio Gratia seu Gratitudo
Benevolentia
Pietas
animi fluctuatio: Zelotypia Ira
Vindicta
Crudelitas
seu Saevitia
Clementia
ad corpus potissimum refertur immoderata cupiditas
et amor
species
animositatis
Hilaritas Titillatio Melancholia Dolor Avaritia Luxuria Temperantia
corporis affectio externa   Ebrietas Sobrietas
Singultus Risus Livor Tremor Libido Castitas
    Animi
in periculis
praesentia
affectus non est
rei singularis imaginatio  
Admiratio Contemptus
Veneratio Horror   Dedignatio


To top of page

Tables of definitions

Table 1. Comparative table of definitions
Emotion Text occurence Formulation Aff. defin. Definition
Cupiditas P. 3. prop. 9. schol. cupiditas est appetitus cum eiusdem conscientia; appetitus [ ... ] nihil aliud est, quam ipsa hominis essentia, ex cuius natura ea, quae ipsius conservationi inserviunt, necessario sequuntur; atque adeo homo ad eadem agendum determinatus est. 1. cupiditas est ipsa hominis essentia, quatenus ex data quacumque eius affectione determinata concipitur ad aliquid agendum
Laetitia P. 3. prop. 11. schol. per laetitiam [ ... ] intelligam passionem, qua mens ad maiorem perfectionem transit 2. laetitia est hominis transitio a minore ad maiorem perfectionem
Tristitia P. 3. prop. 11. schol. per tristitiam [ ...  intelligam] passionem, qua ipsa [ mens ] ad minorem transit perfectionem 3. tristitia est hominis transitio a maiore ad minorem perfectionem
Admiratio P. 3. prop. 52. schol. haec mentis affectio sive rei singularis imaginatio, quatenus sola in mente versatur, vocatur admiratio 4. admiratio est rei alicuius imaginatio, in qua mens defixa propterea manet, quia haec singularis imaginatio nullam cum reliquis habet connexionem
Contemptus P. 3. prop. 52. schol. admirationi opponitur contemptus 5. contemptus est rei alicuius imaginatio, quae mentem adeo parum tangit, ut ipsa mens ex rei praesentia magis moveatur ad ea imaginandum, quae in ipsa re non sunt, quam quae in ipsa sunt
Amor P. 3. prop. 13. schol. amor nihil aliud est, quam laetitia concomitante idea causae externae 6. amor est laetitia concomitante idea causae externae
Odium P. 3. prop. 13. schol. odium nihil aliud [ est ] quam tristitia concomitante idea causae externae 7. odium est tristitia concomitante idea causae externae
Propensio P. 3. prop. 15. schol. s. v. sympathia intelligimus, qui fieri potest, ut quaedam amemus [ ... ] absque ulla causa nobis cognita; sed tantum ex sympathia [ ... ]. Atque huc referenda etiam ea obiecta, quae nos laetitia [ ... ] afficiunt ex eo solo, quod aliquid simile habent obiectis, quae nos iisdem affectibus afficere solent 8. propensio est laetitia concomitante idea alicuius rei, quae per accidens causa est laetitiae
Aversio P. 3. prop. 15. schol. s. v. antipathia intelligimus, qui fieri potest, ut quaedam [ ... ] odio habeamus absque ulla causa nobis cognita; sed tantum ex [ ... ] antipathia. Atque huc referenda etiam ea obiecta, quae nos [ ... ] tristitia afficiunt ex eo solo, quod aliquid simile habent obiectis, quae nos iisdem affectibus afficere solent 9. aversio est tristitia concomitante idea alicuius rei, quae per accidens causa est tristitiae
Devotio P. 3. prop. 52. schol. si hominis, quem amamus, prudentiam, industriam etc. admiramur, amor eo ipso [ ... ] maior erit, et hunc amorem admirationi sive venerationi iunctum devotionem vocamus 10. devotio est amor erga eum, quem admiramur
Irrisio P. 3. prop. 52. schol. irrisio ex rei, quam odimus vel metuimus, contemptu oritur 11. irrisio est laetitia orta ex eo, quod aliquid, quod contemnimus in re, quam odimus, inesse imaginamur
Spes P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 2. spes [ ... ] nihil aliud est quam inconstans laetitia orta ex imagine rei futurae vel praeteritae, de cuius eventu dubitamus 12. spes est inconstans laetitia orta ex idea rei futurae vel praeteritae, de cuius eventu aliquatenus dubitamus
Metus P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 2. metus [ ... ] inconstans tristitia [ est ] ex rei dubiae imagine [ ... ] orta 13. metus est inconstans tristitia orta ex idea rei futurae vel praeteritae, de cuius eventu aliquatenus dubitamus
Securitas P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 2. securitas [ ... ]; nempe laetitia [ ... ] orta ex imagine rei, quam metuimus 14. securitas est laetitia orta ex idea rei futurae vel praeteritae, de qua dubitandi causa sublata est
Desperatio P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 2. desperatio; nempe [ ... ] tristitia orta ex imagine rei, quam [ ... ] speravimus 15. desperatio est tristitia orta ex idea rei futurae vel praeteritae, de qua dubitandi causa sublata est
Gaudium P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 2. gaudium [ ... ] est laetitia orta ex imagine rei praeteritae, de cuius eventu dubitavimus 16. gaudium est laetitia concomitante idea rei praeteritae, quae praeter spem evenit
Conscientiae morsus P. 3. prop. 18. schol. 2. conscientiae [ ... ] morsus est tristitia opposita gaudio 17. conscientiae morsus est tristitia concomitante idea rei praeteritae, quae praeter spem evenit
Commiseratio P. 3. prop. 22. schol. commiseratio quam definire possumus quod sit tristitia orta ex alterius damno 18. commiseratio est tristitia concomitante idea mali, quod alteri, quem nobis similem esse imaginamur, evenit
P. 3. prop. 27. schol. haec affectuum imitatio quando ad tristitiam refertur, vocatur commiseratio
Favor P. 3. prop. 22. schol. amorem erga illum, qui alteri benefecit, favorem [ ... ] appellabimus 19. favor est amor erga aliquem, qui alteri benefecit
Indignatio P. 3. prop. 22. schol. odium erga illum, qui alteri malefecit, indignationem appellabimus 20. indignatio est odium erga aliquem, qui alteri malefecit
Existimatio P. 3. prop. 26. schol. laetitia, quae ex eo oritur, quod homo de alio plus iusto sentit, existimatio vocatur 21. existimatio est de aliquo prae amore plus iusto sentire
Despectus P. 3. prop. 26. schol. illa [ sc. tristitia! ] [ vocatur ] despectus, quae ex eo oritur, quod de alio minus iusto sentit 22. despectus est de aliquo prae odio minus iusto sentire
Invidia P. 3. prop. 24. schol. nihil aliud est, quam ipsum odium, quatenus id consideratur hominem ita disponere, ut malo alterius gaudeat, et contra ut eiusdem bono contristetur 23. invidia est odium, quatenus hominem ita afficit, ut ex alterius felicitate contristetur, et contra ut ex alterius malo gaudeat
Misericordia P. 3. aff. defin. 18. explic. inter commiserationem et misericordiam nulla videtur esse differentia, nisi forte, quod commiseratio singularem affectum respiciat, misericordia autem eius habitum 24. misericordia est amor, quatenus hominem ita afficit, ut ex bono alterius gaudeat, et contra ut ex alterius malo contristetur
Acquiescentia in se ipso P. 3. prop. 30. schol. laetitiam concomitante idea causae internae acquiescentiam in se ipso [ ... ] vocabo 25. acquiescentia in se ipso est laetitia orta ex eo, quod homo se ipsum suamque agendi potentiam contemplatur
P. 3. prop. 51. schol. acquiescentia in se ipso est laetitia concomitante idea sui tamquam causa
P. 3. prop. 55. schol. laetitia [ ... ] quae ex contemplatione nostri oritur, philautia vel acquiescentia in se ipso vocatur
Humilitas P. 3. prop. 55. schol. tristitia concomitante idea nostrae imbecillitatis humilitas appellatur 26. humilitas est tristitia orta ex eo, quod homo suam impotentiam sive imbecillitatem contemplatur
Poenitentia P. 3. prop. 30. schol. tristitiam [ ... ] [ concomitante idea causae internae ] poenitentiam vocabo 27. poenitentia est tristitia concomitante idea alicuius facti, quod nos ex libero mentis decreto fecisse credimus
P. 3. prop. 51. schol. poenitentia est tristitia concomitante idea sui [ tamquam causa ]
Superbia P. 3. prop. 26. schol. est igitur superbia laetitia ex eo orta, quod homo de se plus iusto sentit 28. superbia est de se prae amore sui plus iusto sentire
Abiectio P. 4. prop. 57. schol. abiectio [ ... ] definienda esset tristitia orta ex falsa opinione, quod homo se infra reliquos esse credit 29. abiectio est de se prae tristitia minus iusto sentire
Gloria P. 3. prop. 30. schol. laetitiam concomitante idea causae internae gloriam [ ... ] appellabimus; intellige, quando laetitia [ ... ] ex eo oritur, quod homo se laudari [ ... ] credit 30. gloria est laetitia concomitante idea alicuius nostrae actionis, quam alios laudare imaginamur
Pudor P. 3. prop. 30. schol. tristitiam [ concomitante idea causae internae ] pudorem appellabimus; intellige, quando [ ... ] tristitia ex eo oritur, quod homo se [ ... ] vituperari credit 31. pudor est tristitia concomitante idea alicuius nostrae actionis, quam alios vituperare imaginamur
Desiderium P. 3. prop. 36. schol. tristitia, quatenus absentiam eius, quod amamus, respicit, desiderium vocatur 32. desiderium est cupiditas sive appetitus re aliqua potiundi, quae eiusdem rei memoria fovetur, et simul aliarum rerum memoria, quae eiusdem rei appetendae existentiam secludunt, coercetur
Aemulatio P. 3. prop. 27. schol. haec affectuum imitatio ad cupiditatem relata [ vocatur ] aemulatio, quae [ ... ] nihil aliud est, quam alicuius rei cupiditas, quae in nobis ingeneratur ex eo, quod alios nobis similes eandem cupiditatem habere imaginamur 33. aemulatio est alicuius rei cupiditas, quae nobis ingeneratur ex eo, quod alios eandem cupiditatem habere imaginamur
Gratia seu Gratitudo P. 3. prop. 41. schol. conatus benefaciendi ei, qui nos amat, quique [ ... ] nobis benefacere conatur, gratia seu gratitudo vocatur 34. gratia seu gratitudo est cupiditas seu amoris studium, quo ei benefacere conamur, qui in nos pari amoris affectu beneficium contulit
Benevolentia P. 3. prop. 27. coroll. 3. schol. voluntas sive appetitus benefaciendi qui ex eo oritur, quod rei, in quam beneficium conferre volumus, nos miseret, benevolentia vocatur 35. benevolentia est cupiditas benefaciendi ei, cuius nos miseret
Ira P. 3. prop. 40. coroll. 2. schol. conatus malum inferendi ei, quem odimus, ira vocatur 36. ira est cupiditas, qua ex odio incitamur ad illi quem odimus malum inferendum
Vindicta P. 3. prop. 40. coroll. 2. schol. conatus [ ... ] malum nobis illatum referendi vindicta appellatur 37. vindicta est cupiditas, qua ex reciproco odio concitamur ad malum inferendum ei, qui nobis pari affectu damnum intulit
Crudelitas seu Saevitia P. 3. prop. 41. coroll. schol. qui ab eo, quem odio habet, se amari imaginatur, odio et amore simul conflictabitur; quod si odium praevaluerit, ei, a quo amatur, malum inferre conabitur, qui quidem affectus crudelitas appellatur, praecipue si illum, qui amat, nullam odii communem causam praebuisse creditur 38. crudelitas seu saevitia est cupiditas, qua aliquis concitatur ad malum inferendum ei, quem amamus, vel cuius nos miseret
Timor P. 3. prop. 39. schol. timor [ ... ] nihil aliud est quam metus quatenus homo ab eodem disponitur ad malum, quod futurum iudicat, minore vitandum 39. timor est cupiditas maius quod metuimus malum minore vitandi
Audacia P. 3. prop. 51. schol. si [ ... ] ad hoc attendam, quod eius cupiditas malum inferendi ei quem odit, et benefaciendi ei quem amat, non coercetur timore mali, a quo ego contineri soleo, ipsum audacem appellabo 40. audacia est cupiditas, qua aliquis incitatur ad aliquid agendum cum periculo, quod eius aequales subire metuunt
Pusillanimitas P. 3. prop. 51. schol. si [ ... ] ad hoc attendam, quod eius cupiditas coercetur timore mali, quod me continere nequit, ipsum pusillanimem esse dicam 41. pusillanimitas dicitur de eo, cuius cupiditas coercetur timore periculi, quod eius aequales subire audent
Consternatio P. 3. prop. 39. schol. si cupiditas malum futurum vitandi coercetur timore alterius mali, ita ut quid potius velit nesciat, tum metus vocatur consternatio 42. consternatio dicitur de eo, cuius cupiditas malum vitandi coercetur admiratione mali, quod timet
P. 3. prop. 52. schol. haec mentis affectio sive rei singularis imaginatio, quatenus sola in mente versatur, [ ... ] si ab obiecto, quod timemus, moveatur, consternatio dicitur
Humanitas seu Modestia P. 3. prop. 29. schol. conatus aliquid agendi et etiam omittendi, ea sola de causa, ut hominibus placeamus, [ vocatur ambitio praesertim quando ... ;] alias humanitas appellari solet 43. humanitas seu modestia est cupiditas ea faciendi quae hominibus placent, et omittendi quae displicent
P. 3. prop. 59. schol. modestia [ ... ] species generositatis [ est ]
P. 3. aff. defin. 48. explic. modestia species est ambitionis
Ambitio P. 3. prop. 29. schol. conatus aliquid agendi et etiam omittendi, ea sola de causa, ut hominibus placeamus, vocatur ambitio praesertim quando adeo impense vulgo placere conamur, ut cum nostro aut alterius damno quaedam agamus vel omittamus 44. ambitio est immodica gloriae cupiditas
P. 3. prop. 56. schol. per [ ... ] ambitionem nihil aliud intelligimus, quam [ ... ] gloriae immoderatum amorem vel cupiditatem
P. 5. prop. 4. schol. unusquisque appetat, ut reliqui ex ipsius ingenio vivant [ ... ]; qui quidem appetitus in homine, qui ratione non ducitur, passio est, quae ambitio vocatur
Luxuria P. 3. prop. 56. schol. per luxuriam [ ... ] nihil aliud intelligimus, quam convivandi [ ... ] immoderatum amorem vel cupiditatem 45. luxuria est immoderata convivandi cupiditas vel etiam amor
Ebrietas P. 3. prop. 56. schol. per [ ... ] ebrietatem [ ... ] nihil aliud intelligimus, quam [ ... ] potandi [ ... ] immoderatum amorem vel cupiditatem 46. ebrietas est immoderata potandi cupiditas et amor
Avaritia P. 3. prop. 56. schol. per [ ... ] avaritiam [ ... ] nihil aliud intelligimus, quam [ ... ] divitiarum [ ... ] immoderatum amorem vel cupiditatem 47. avaritia est immoderata divitiarum cupiditas et amor
Libido P. 3. prop. 56. schol. per [ ... ] libidinem [ ... ] nihil aliud intelligimus, quam [ ... ] coeundi [ ... ] immoderatum amorem vel cupiditatem 48. libido est etiam cupiditas et amor in commiscendis corporibus


Table 2. Definitions of related notions
Notion Reference Formulation
Hilaritas P. 3. prop. 11. schol. affectum laetitiae ad mentem et corpus simul relatum [ ... ] hilaritatem voco [ ... ]. Sed notandum, [ ... ] hilaritatem [ ad hominem referri ], quando omnes [ sc. eius partes ] pariter sunt affectae
P. 3. aff. defin. 3. explic. definitiones hilaritatis [ ... ] omitto, quia ad corpus potissimum referuntur et non nisi laetitiae aut tristitiae sunt species
Melancholia P. 3. prop. 11. schol. affectum [ ... ] tristitiae [ ad mentem et corpus simul relatum ] [ ... ] melancholiam [ voco ]. Sed notandum, [ ... ] melancholiam [ ad hominem referri ], quando omnes [ sc. eius partes ] pariter sunt affectae
P. 3. aff. defin. 3. explic. definitiones [ ... ] melancholiae [ ... ] omitto, quia ad corpus potissimum referuntur et non nisi laetitiae aut tristitiae sunt species
Titillatio P. 3. prop. 11. schol. affectum laetitiae ad mentem et corpus simul relatum titillationem [ ... ] voco [ ... ]. Sed notandum, titillationem [ ... ] ad hominem referri, quando una eius pars prae reliquis est affecta
P. 3. aff. defin. 3. explic. definitiones [ ... ] titillationis [ ... ] omitto, quia ad corpus potissimum referuntur et non nisi laetitiae aut tristitiae sunt species
Dolor P. 3. prop. 11. schol. affectum [ ... ] tristitiae [ ad mentem et corpus simul relatum ] dolorem [ ... ] [ voco ]. Sed notandum, [ ... ] dolorem ad hominem referri, quando una eius pars prae reliquis est affecta
P. 3. aff. defin. 3. explic. definitiones [ ... ] doloris omitto, quia ad corpus potissimum referuntur et non nisi laetitiae aut tristitiae sunt species
[ Laetitiae imitatio ] P. 3. prop. 22. schol. quo autem nomine appellanda sit laetitia, quae ex alterius bono oritur, nescio
Laus P. 3. prop. 29. schol. laetitiam, qua alterius actionem, qua nos conatus est delectari, imaginamur, laudem voco
Vituperium P. 3. prop. 29. schol. tristitiam [ ... ] qua [ ... ] eiusdem actionem aversamur, vituperium voco
Zelotypia P. 3. prop. 35. schol. nihil aliud est, quam animi fluctuatio orta ex amore et odio simul, concomitante idea alterius, cui invidetur
Verecundia P. 3. prop. 39. schol. si malum, quod timet, pudor sit, tum timor appellatur verecundia
P. 3. aff. defin. 31. explic. [ est ] verecundia [ ... ] metus seu timor pudoris, quo homo continetur, ne aliquid turpe committat
[ Desiderio oppositum ] P. 3. prop. 47. laetitia, quae ex eo oritur, quod scilicet rem, quam odimus, destrui aut alio malo affici imaginamur
Veneratio P. 3. prop. 52. schol. si id, quod admiramur, sit hominis alicuius prudentia, industria vel aliquid huiusmodi, quia eo ipso hominem nobis longe antecellere contemplamur, tum admiratio vocatur veneratio
P. 3. aff. defin. 5. explic. definitiones venerationis [ ... ] missas hic facio, quia nulli, quod sciam, affectus ex his nomen trahunt
Horror P. 3. prop. 52. schol. alias [ admiratio vocatur ] horror si hominis iram, invidiam etc. admiramur
Dedignatio P. 3. prop. 52. schol. dedignatio ex stultitiae contemptu [ oritur ]
P. 3. aff. defin. 5. explic. definitiones [ ... ] dedignationis missas hic facio, quia nulli, quod sciam, affectus ex his nomen trahunt
Castitas P. 3. prop. 56. schol. castitas, quam libidini opponere solemus, affectus seu [ passio ] non [ est ]; sed animi [ indicat ] potentiam, quae hos affectus moderatur
Animositas P. 3. prop. 59. schol. per animositatem intelligo cupiditatem, qua unusquisque conatur suum esse ex solo rationis dictamine conservare [ ... ] eas itaque actiones, quae solum agentis utile intendunt, ad animositatem [ ... ] refero
Temperantia P. 3. prop. 59. schol. temperantia [ ... ] animositatis [ est ] species
P. 3. prop. 56. schol. temperantia, quam luxuriae [ ... ] opponere solemus, affectus seu [ passio ] non [ est ]; sed animi [ indicat ] potentiam, quae hos affectus moderatur
Sobrietas P. 3. prop. 59. schol. sobrietas [ ... ] animositatis [ est ] species
P. 3. prop. 56. schol. sobrietas, quam ebrietati [ ... ] opponere solemus, affectus seu [ passio ] non [ est ]; sed animi [ indicat ] potentiam, quae hos affectus moderatur
Animi in periculis praesentia P. 3. prop. 59. schol. animi in periculis praesentia [ ... ] animositatis [ est ] species
Generositas P. 3. prop. 59. schol. per generositatem [ ... ] cupiditatem intelligo, qua unusquisque ex solo rationis dictamine conatur reliquos homines iuvare et sibi amicitia iungere [ ... ] eas itaque actiones, [ ... ] quae alterius etiam utile intendunt, ad generositatem refero
Clementia P. 3. prop. 59. schol. clementia [ ... ] species generositatis [ est ]
P. 3. aff. defin. 38. explic. crudelitati opponitur clementia, quae passio non est, sed animi potentia, qua homo iram et vindictam moderatur
Impudentia P. 3. aff. defin. 31. explic. verecundiae opponi solet impudentia, quae revera affectus non est, ut suo loco ostendam
Pietas P. 4. prop. 37. schol. 1. cupiditatem [ ... ] bene faciendi, quae eo ingeneratur, quod ex rationis ductu vivimus, pietatem voco
Honestas P. 4. prop. 37. schol. 1. cupiditatem [ ... ] qua homo, qui ex ductu rationis vivit, tenetur ut reliquos sibi amicitia iungat, honestatem voco
Turpitudo P. 4. prop. 37. schol. 1. id [ ... ] turpe [ voco ], quod conciliandae amicitiae repugnat
Inhumanitas P. 4. prop. 50. schol. qui nec ratione, nec commiseratione movetur, ut aliis auxilio sit, is recte inhumanus appellatur
Ingratitudo P. 4. prop. 71. schol. porro ingratitudo affectus non est. Est tamen ingratitudo turpis, quia plerumque hominem nimio odio, ira vel superbia vel avaritia etc. affectum esse indicat
Modestia P. 4. app. cap. 25. modestia, hoc est, cupiditas hominibus placendi, quae ex ratione determinatur, ad pietatem [ ... ] refertur

Index of terms

Abiectio
Acquiescentia in se ipso
Admiratio
Aemulatio
Ambitio
Amor
Animi in periculis praesentia
Animositas
Appetitus
Audacia
Avaritia
Aversio
Benevolentia
Castitas
Clementia
Commiseratio
Conscientiae morsus
Consternatio
Contemptus
Crudelitas seu Saevitia
Cupiditas
Dedignatio
Desiderium
[ Desiderio oppositum ]
Despectus
Desperatio
Devotio
Dolor
Ebrietas
Existimatio
Favor
Gaudium
Generositas
Gloria
Gratia seu Gratitudo
Hilaritas
Honestas
Horror
Humanitas
Humilitas
Impudentia
Indignatio
Ingratitudo
Inhumanitas
Invidia
Ira
Irrisio
Laetitia
[ Laetitiae imitatio ]
Laus
Libido
Luxuria
Melancholia
Metus
Misericordia
Modestia
Odium
Pietas
Poenitentia
Propensio
Pudor
Pusillanimitas
Securitas
Sobrietas
Spes
Superbia
Temperantia
Timor
Titillatio
Tristitia
Turpitudo
Veneratio
Verecundia
Vindicta
Vituperium
Voluntas
Zelotypia

Return to main page

Page last updated

Visit the author’s homepage or send an e-mail

To top of page